ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V21.30

Low birthwt status NOS

Diagnosis Code V21.30

ICD-9: V21.30
Short Description: Low birthwt status NOS
Long Description: Low birth weight status, unspecified
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V21.30

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons encountering health services in circumstances related to reproduction and development (V20-V29)
      • V21 Constitutional states in development

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code V21.30 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Premature Babies

Also called: Preemies

Almost 1 of every 10 infants born in the United States are premature, or preemies. A premature birth is when a baby is born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. A full-term pregnancy is 40 weeks.

Important growth and development happen throughout pregnancy - especially in the final months and weeks. Because they are born too early, preemies weigh much less than full-term babies. They may have health problems because their organs did not have enough time to develop. Problems that a baby born too early may have include

  • Breathing problems
  • Feeding difficulties
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Developmental delay
  • Vision problems
  • Hearing problems

Preemies need special medical care in a neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU. They stay there until their organ systems can work on their own.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Apnea of prematurity
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal weight gain and nutrition
  • Osteopenia - premature infants
  • Premature infant
  • Preterm labor
  • Retinopathy of prematurity
  • Transient tachypnea - newborn
  • Visiting your baby in the NICU

[Read More]

Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Caput succedaneum
  • Craniotabes
  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Home apnea monitor use - infants
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Hyperviscosity - newborn
  • Hypocalcemia - infants
  • Intussusception (children)
  • Irritability
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants
  • Pyloric stenosis
  • Spasmus nutans
  • Tongue tie
  • Tracheomalacia - acquired
  • Transient tachypnea - newborn

[Read More]
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