ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 989.5

Toxic effect venom

Diagnosis Code 989.5

ICD-9: 989.5
Short Description: Toxic effect venom
Long Description: Toxic effect of venom
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 989.5

Code Classification
  • Injury and poisoning
    • Toxic effects of substances chiefly nonmedicinal as to source (980-989)
      • 989 Toxic effect of other substances, chiefly nonmedicinal as to source

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 989.5 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Animal Bites

Also called: Cat bites, Dog bites

Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their young or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they become infected, you can develop serious medical problems.

To prevent animal bites and complications from bites

  • Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals
  • Leave snakes alone
  • Watch your children closely around animals
  • Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies
  • Spay or neuter your dog to make it less aggressive
  • Get a tetanus booster if you have not had one recently
  • Wear boots and long pants when you are in areas with venomous snakes

If an animal bites you, clean the wound with soap and water as soon as possible. Get medical attention if necessary.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Animal bites -- self-care
  • Human bites
  • Human bites -- self-care
  • Jellyfish stings
  • Marine animal stings or bites
  • Snake bites

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Insect Bites and Stings

Also called: Bug bites

Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. Bee, wasp, and hornet stings and fire ant bites usually hurt. Mosquito, flea, and mite bites usually itch. Insects can also spread diseases. In the United States, some mosquitoes spread West Nile virus. Travelers outside the United States may be at risk for malaria and other infections.

To prevent insect bites and their complications

  • Don't bother insects
  • Use insect repellant
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Be careful when you eat outside because food attracts insects
  • If you know you have severe allergic reactions to insect bites and stings (such as anaphylaxis), carry an emergency epinephrine kit

  • Anaphylaxis
  • Bee poison
  • Bug repellent safety
  • Caterpillars
  • Centipede
  • Chiggers
  • Fire ants
  • Fleas
  • Insect bites and stings
  • Millipede toxin
  • Rickettsial pox
  • Scorpions
  • Typhus
  • Wasp sting

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Spider Bites

Though many people are afraid of spiders, they rarely bite people unless threatened. Most spider bites are harmless. Occasionally, spider bites can cause allergic reactions. And bites by the venomous black widow and brown recluse spiders can be very dangerous to people.

If you are bitten by a spider, you may see a reaction similar to that of a bee sting, including redness, pain and swelling at the site. To treat a spider bite:

  • Wash the area well with soap and water
  • Apply an ice pack or a wet compress to the area
  • Take over-the-counter pain medicine, if needed
  • Consider using antihistamines for severe swelling
  • Seek medical treatment for small children and adults with severe symptoms

  • Black widow spider
  • Brown recluse spider
  • Funnel-web spider bite
  • Tarantula spider

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