ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 838.05

Disl metatarsophalang-cl

Diagnosis Code 838.05

ICD-9: 838.05
Short Description: Disl metatarsophalang-cl
Long Description: Closed dislocation of metatarsophalangeal (joint)
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 838.05

Code Classification
  • Injury and poisoning
    • Dislocation (830-839)
      • 838 Dislocation of foot

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 838.05 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

    • Dislocation (articulation) (closed) (displacement) (simple) (subluxation) 839.8
      • metatarsophalangeal (joint) (closed) 838.05
        • open 838.15

Information for Patients


Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a blow, sometimes from playing a contact sport. You can dislocate your ankles, knees, shoulders, hips, elbows and jaw. You can also dislocate your finger and toe joints. Dislocated joints often are swollen, very painful and visibly out of place. You may not be able to move it.

A dislocated joint is an emergency. If you have one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, medicine, a splint or sling, and rehabilitation. When properly repositioned, a joint will usually function and move normally again in a few weeks. Once you dislocate a shoulder or kneecap, you are more likely to dislocate it again. Wearing protective gear during sports may help prevent dislocations.

  • Dislocated shoulder - aftercare
  • Dislocation
  • Kneecap dislocation
  • Kneecap dislocation - aftercare
  • Nursemaid's elbow

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Foot Injuries and Disorders

Each of your feet has 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments. No wonder a lot of things can go wrong. Here are a few common problems:

  • Bunions - hard, painful bumps on the big toe joint
  • Corns and calluses - thickened skin from friction or pressure
  • Plantar warts - warts on the soles of your feet
  • Fallen arches - also called flat feet

Ill-fitting shoes often cause these problems. Aging and being overweight also increase your chances of having foot problems.

  • Claw foot
  • Clubfoot
  • Clubfoot repair
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction
  • Extremity x-ray
  • Flat feet
  • Foot pain
  • Foot sprain - aftercare
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling
  • Hand or foot spasms
  • High arch
  • Leg or foot amputation
  • Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare
  • Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare
  • Metatarsus adductus
  • Morton's neuroma

[Read More]
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