ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 759.0

Anomalies of spleen

Diagnosis Code 759.0

ICD-9: 759.0
Short Description: Anomalies of spleen
Long Description: Anomalies of spleen
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 759.0

Code Classification
  • Congenital anomalies
    • Congenital anomalies (740-759)
      • 759 Other and unspecified congenital anomalies

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 759.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some result from exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome. Infections during pregnancy can also result in birth defects. For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Some birth defects can be prevented. Taking folic acid can help prevent some birth defects. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take. Some medicines can cause serious birth defects.

Babies with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Intersex

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Spleen Diseases

Also called: Splenic diseases

Your spleen is an organ above your stomach and under your ribs on your left side. It is about as big as your fist. The spleen is part of your lymphatic system, which fights infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. It contains white blood cells that fight germs. Your spleen also helps control the amount of blood in your body, and destroys old and damaged cells.

Certain diseases might cause your spleen to swell. You can also damage or rupture your spleen in an injury, especially if it is already swollen. If your spleen is too damaged, you might need surgery to remove it. You can live without a spleen. Other organs, such as your liver, will take over some of the spleen's work. Without a spleen, however, your body will lose some of its ability to fight infections.

  • Hypersplenism
  • Spleen removal
  • Spleen removal - child - discharge
  • Spleen removal - laparoscopic - adults - discharge
  • Spleen removal - open - adults - discharge
  • Splenomegaly

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