ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 753.3

Kidney anomaly NEC

Diagnosis Code 753.3

ICD-9: 753.3
Short Description: Kidney anomaly NEC
Long Description: Other specified anomalies of kidney
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 753.3

Code Classification
  • Congenital anomalies
    • Congenital anomalies (740-759)
      • 753 Congenital anomalies of urinary system

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Accessory kidney
  • Acrorenal field defect, ectodermal dysplasia, and lipoatrophic diabetes
  • Bifid kidney
  • Cake kidney
  • Congenital abnormal shape of kidney
  • Congenital anomaly of the kidney
  • Congenital calculus of kidney
  • Congenital calyceal diverticulum
  • Congenital enlarged kidney
  • Congenital hyperplasia of kidney
  • Congenital hypoplasia of renal papilla
  • Congenital lobulation of kidney
  • Congenital malposition of kidney
  • Congenital obstructive defect of renal pelvis
  • Congenital renal failure
  • Crossed ectopia of kidney with fusion anomaly
  • Crossed ectopia of kidney, without fusion
  • Crossed renal ectopia
  • Discoid kidney
  • Double kidney
  • Double kidney AND/OR pelvis
  • Double kidney with double pelvis
  • Double renal pelvis
  • Duplex kidney with reflux in both ureters
  • Duplex kidney with reflux in one ureter
  • Ectopic kidney
  • Familial hypoplastic, glomerulocystic kidney
  • Fusion of kidneys
  • Giant kidney
  • Horseshoe kidney
  • Hyperplasia of kidney
  • Malrotation of kidney
  • Megacalycosis
  • Nodular renal blastema
  • Prominent renal pelvis
  • Pyelon triplex
  • Thoracic kidney
  • Trifid kidney
  • Trifid pelvis of kidney
  • Triple kidney with triple pelvis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 753.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some result from exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome. Infections during pregnancy can also result in birth defects. For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Some birth defects can be prevented. Taking folic acid can help prevent some birth defects. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take. Some medicines can cause serious birth defects.

Babies with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Intersex

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Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • 24-hour urine protein
  • Abdominal MRI
  • Abdominal tap
  • ACE inhibitors
  • Acid loading test (pH)
  • Acute nephritic syndrome
  • Albumin - serum
  • Analgesic nephropathy
  • Atheroembolic renal disease
  • Bartter syndrome
  • Basic metabolic panel
  • Bilateral hydronephrosis
  • BUN
  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome
  • Creatinine - urine
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Goodpasture syndrome
  • IgA nephropathy
  • Injury - kidney and ureter
  • Interstitial nephritis
  • Kidney biopsy
  • Kidney removal
  • Kidney removal - discharge
  • Medicines and Kidney Disease - NIH (National Kidney Disease Education Program)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I
  • Membranous nephropathy
  • Microalbuminuria test
  • Minimal change disease
  • Nephrocalcinosis
  • Nephrotic syndrome
  • Obstructive uropathy
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Protein urine test
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis
  • Reflux nephropathy
  • Renal arteriography
  • Renal papillary necrosis
  • Renal perfusion scintiscan
  • Renal scan
  • Renal vein thrombosis
  • Renal venogram
  • Total protein
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis
  • Urinary casts

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