ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 711.19

Reiter arthritis-mult

Diagnosis Code 711.19

ICD-9: 711.19
Short Description: Reiter arthritis-mult
Long Description: Arthropathy associated with Reiter's disease and nonspecific urethritis, multiple sites
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 711.19

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
    • Arthropathies and related disorders (710-719)
      • 711 Arthropathy associated with infections

Information for Patients

Infectious Arthritis

Also called: Septic arthritis

Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection comes from a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection that spreads from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include

  • Intense pain in the joint
  • Joint redness and swelling
  • Chills and fever
  • Inability to move the area with the infected joint

One type of infectious arthritis is reactive arthritis. The reaction is to an infection somewhere else in your body. The joint is usually the knee, ankle, or toe. Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set off by an infection in the bladder, or in the urethra, which carries urine out of the body. In women, an infection in the vagina can cause the reaction. For both men and women, it can start with bacteria passed on during sex. Another form of reactive arthritis starts with eating food or handling something that has bacteria on it.

To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  • Culture - joint fluid
  • Fungal arthritis
  • HLA-B27 antigen
  • Reactive arthritis
  • Septic arthritis
  • Viral arthritis

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Urethral Disorders

The urethra is the tube that allows urine to pass out of the body. In men, it's a long tube that runs through the penis. It also carries semen in men. In women, it's short and is just above the vagina. Urethral problems may happen due to aging, illness, or injury. They include

  • Urethral stricture - a narrowing of the opening of the urethra
  • Urethritis - inflammation of the urethra, sometimes caused by infection

Urethral problems may cause pain or difficulty passing urine. You may also have bleeding or discharge from the urethra.

Doctors diagnose urethral problems using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays and an examination of the urethra with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

  • Chlamydial urethritis - male
  • Epispadias
  • Indwelling catheter care
  • Meatal stenosis
  • Self catheterization - female
  • Self catheterization - male
  • Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra
  • Urethral discharge culture
  • Urethral stricture
  • Urethritis
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

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