ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 670.02

Maj puer inf NOS-del p/p

Diagnosis Code 670.02

ICD-9: 670.02
Short Description: Maj puer inf NOS-del p/p
Long Description: Major puerperal infection, delivered, with mention of postpartum complication
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 670.02

Code Classification
  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium
    • Complications of the puerperium (670-677)
      • 670 Major puerperal infection

Information for Patients

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Actinomycosis
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Blood culture
  • Gram stain
  • Gram stain of skin lesion
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection
  • Q fever
  • Serology for tularemia
  • Shigellosis
  • Stool Gram stain
  • Tularemia

[Read More]

Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Losing weight after pregnancy
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge

[Read More]
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