ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 647.34


Diagnosis Code 647.34

ICD-9: 647.34
Short Description: Tuberculosis-postpartum
Long Description: Tuberculosis of mother, complicating pregnancy, childbirth, or the puerperium,postpartum condition or complication
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 647.34

Code Classification
  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium
    • Complications mainly related to pregnancy (640-649)
      • 647 Infective and parasitic conditions in the mother classifiable elsewhere but complicating pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium

Information for Patients

Infections and Pregnancy

If you are pregnant, an infection can be more than just a problem for you. Some infections can be dangerous to your baby. You can help yourself avoid infections:

  • Don't eat raw or undercooked meat
  • Don't share food or drinks with other people
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Don't empty cat litter. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis.

You may need to take medicines or get a vaccine to prevent an infection in your baby. For example, you may need to take antibiotics if you develop an infection with group B strep, or take medicines if you have genital herpes. Only some medicines and vaccines are safe during pregnancy. Ask your health care provider about how best to protect you and your baby.

  • Bacterial Vaginosis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Group B streptococcal septicemia of the newborn
  • Group B streptococcus - pregnancy
  • Immunization and Pregnancy (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pregnancy and the flu
  • Pregnant Women Need a Flu Shot (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Protect Your Baby for Life: When a Pregnant Woman Has Hepatitis B (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Women (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Losing weight after pregnancy
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge

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Also called: TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body.

TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.

Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include

  • A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Coughing up blood or mucus
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Fever
  • Night sweats

Skin tests, blood tests, x-rays, and other tests can tell if you have TB. If not treated properly, TB can be deadly. You can usually cure active TB by taking several medicines for a long period of time.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Acid-fast stain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Disseminated tuberculosis
  • Meningitis - tuberculous
  • Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Mycobacterial culture
  • PPD skin test
  • Pulmonary tuberculosis
  • Routine sputum culture
  • Scrofula
  • Taking medicines to treat tuberculosis
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis: General Information (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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