ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 646.51

Asym bacteriuria-deliver

Diagnosis Code 646.51

ICD-9: 646.51
Short Description: Asym bacteriuria-deliver
Long Description: Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy, delivered, with or without mention of antepartum condition
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 646.51

Code Classification
  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium
    • Complications mainly related to pregnancy (640-649)
      • 646 Other complications of pregnancy, not elsewhere classified

Information for Patients

Health Problems in Pregnancy

Every pregnancy has some risk of problems. The causes can be conditions you already have or conditions you develop. They also include being pregnant with more than one baby, previous problem pregnancies, or being over age 35. They can affect your health and the health of your baby.

If you have a chronic condition, you should talk to your health care provider about how to minimize your risk before you get pregnant. Once you are pregnant, you may need a health care team to monitor your pregnancy. Examples of common conditions that can complicate a pregnancy include

  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Kidney problems
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Infections

Other conditions that can make pregnancy risky can happen while you are pregnant - for example, gestational diabetes and Rh incompatibility. Good prenatal care can help detect and treat them.

Some discomforts, like nausea, back pain, and fatigue, are common during pregnancy. Sometimes it is hard to know what is normal. Call your doctor or midwife if something is bothering or worrying you.

  • Bed rest during pregnancy
  • Hydramnios
  • Hyperemesis gravidarum
  • Insufficient cervix
  • Morning sickness
  • Morning sickness
  • Placenta abruptio
  • Placenta abruptio
  • Placenta previa
  • Polyhydramnios
  • Serum progesterone
  • Striae
  • Vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy
  • Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy
  • Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

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Urinary Tract Infections

Also called: UTI

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Catheter-associated UTI
  • Cystitis - acute bacterial
  • Leukocyte esterase
  • Radionuclide cystogram
  • Retrograde cystography
  • Ureteroscopy
  • Urinary tract infection - adults
  • Urinary tract infection - children
  • Urinary tract infection in children - aftercare
  • Urine culture
  • Voiding cystourethrogram

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