ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 629.81

Rec preg loss wo cur prg

Diagnosis Code 629.81

ICD-9: 629.81
Short Description: Rec preg loss wo cur prg
Long Description: Recurrent pregnancy loss without current pregnancy
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 629.81

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (580–629)
    • Other disorders of female genital tract (617-629)
      • 629 Other disorders of female genital organs

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • N96 - Recurrent pregnancy loss

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 629.81 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Female Infertility

Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 months if the woman is over age 35). If a woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, hormone problems, and lifestyle or environmental factors.

Most cases of infertility in women result from problems with producing eggs. In premature ovarian failure, the ovaries stop functioning before natural menopause. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the ovaries may not release an egg regularly or they may not release a healthy egg.

About a third of the time, infertility is because of a problem with the woman. One third of the time, it is a problem with the man. Sometimes no cause can be found.

If you think you might be infertile, see your doctor. There are tests that may tell if you have fertility problems. When it is possible to find the cause, treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies. Happily, many couples treated for infertility are able to have babies.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • Estradiol - test
  • Hysterosalpingography
  • Hysteroscopy
  • Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test
  • Prolactin
  • Serum progesterone


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Miscarriage

Also called: Spontaneous abortion

A miscarriage is the loss of pregnancy from natural causes before the 20th week of pregnancy. Most miscarriages occur very early in the pregnancy, often before a woman even knows she is pregnant. There are many different causes for a miscarriage. In most cases, there is nothing you can do to prevent a miscarriage.

Factors that may contribute to miscarriage include

  • A genetic problem with the fetus. This is the most common cause in the first trimester.
  • Problems with the uterus or cervix. These contribute in the second trimester.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome

Signs of a miscarriage can include vaginal spotting or bleeding, abdominal pain or cramping, and fluid or tissue passing from the vagina. Although vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of miscarriage, many women have spotting early in their pregnancy but do not miscarry. But if you are pregnant and have bleeding or spotting, contact your health care provider immediately.

Women who miscarry early in their pregnancy usually do not need any treatment. In some cases, you may need a procedure called a dilatation and curettage (D&C) to remove tissue remaining in the uterus.

Counseling may help you cope with your grief. Later, if you do decide to try again, work closely with your health care provider to lower the risks. Many women who have a miscarriage go on to have healthy babies.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • Choriocarcinoma
  • D and C
  • HCG blood test - quantitative
  • Miscarriage
  • Miscarriage - threatened
  • Serum progesterone


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Stillbirth

If a woman loses a pregnancy after she's past her 20th week, it's called a stillbirth. Stillbirths are due to natural causes. They can happen before delivery or during delivery. Causes include:

  • Problems with the placenta, the organ that transports oxygen and nutrients to the fetus
  • Genetic problems with the fetus
  • Fetal infections
  • Other physical problems in the fetus

In at least half of all cases, it is not possible to tell why the baby died.

If stillbirth happens before delivery, your health care provider may induce labor or perform a Cesarean section to deliver the fetus. In some cases, you can wait until you go into labor yourself. This usually happens within two weeks of stillbirth.

Counseling may help you cope with your grief. Later, if you do decide to try again, work closely with your health care provider to lower the risks. Many women who have a stillbirth go on to have healthy babies.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • When your baby is stillborn


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