ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 391.1

Acute rheumatic endocard

Diagnosis Code 391.1

ICD-9: 391.1
Short Description: Acute rheumatic endocard
Long Description: Acute rheumatic endocarditis
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 391.1

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system
    • Acute rheumatic fever (390-392)
      • 391 Rheumatic fever with heart involvement

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • I01.1 - Acute rheumatic endocarditis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 391.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Endocarditis, also called infective endocarditis (IE), is an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart. The most common type, bacterial endocarditis, occurs when germs enter your heart. These germs come through your bloodstream from another part of your body, often your mouth. Bacterial endocarditis can damage your heart valves. If untreated, it can be life-threatening. It is rare in healthy hearts.

Risk factors include having

  • An abnormal or damaged heart valve
  • An artificial heart valve
  • Congenital heart defects

The signs and symptoms of IE can vary from person to person. They also can vary over time in the same person. Symptoms you might notice include fever, shortness of breath, fluid buildup in your arms or legs, tiny red spots on your skin, and weight loss. Your doctor will diagnose IE based on your risk factors, medical history, signs and symptoms, and lab and heart tests.

Early treatment can help you avoid complications. Treatment usually involves high-dose antibiotics. If your heart valve is damaged, you may need surgery.

If you're at risk for IE, brush and floss your teeth regularly, and have regular dental checkups. Germs from a gum infection can enter your bloodstream. If you are at high risk, your doctor might prescribe antibiotics before dental work and certain types of surgery.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Culture-negative endocarditis
  • Endocarditis

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Streptococcal Infections

Also called: Strep

Strep is short for Streptococcus, a type of bacteria. There are two types: group A and group B.

Group A strep causes

  • Strep throat - a sore, red throat, sometimes with white spots on the tonsils
  • Scarlet fever - an illness that follows strep throat. It causes a red rash on the body.
  • Impetigo - a skin infection
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease)

Group B strep can cause blood infections, pneumonia and meningitis in newborns. A screening test during pregnancy can tell if you have it. If you do, I.V. antibiotics during labor can save your baby's life. Adults can also get group B strep infections, especially if they are elderly or already have health problems. Strep B can cause urinary tract infections, blood infections, skin infections and pneumonia in adults.

Antibiotics are used to treat strep infections.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Ecthyma
  • Erysipelas
  • Group B streptococcal septicemia of the newborn
  • Group B streptococcus - pregnancy
  • Perianal streptococcal cellulitis
  • Rheumatic fever
  • Scarlet fever
  • Strep throat
  • Streptococcal screen
  • Sydenham chorea
  • Throat swab culture
  • Toxic shock syndrome

[Read More]
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