ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 251.3

Postsurg hypoinsulinemia

Diagnosis Code 251.3

ICD-9: 251.3
Short Description: Postsurg hypoinsulinemia
Long Description: Postsurgical hypoinsulinemia
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 251.3

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, and immunity disorders
    • Diseases of other endocrine glands (249-259)
      • 251 Other disorders of pancreatic internal secretion

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • E89.1 - Postprocedural hypoinsulinemia

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 251.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

    • Hyperglycemia 790.29
      • postpancreatectomy (complete) (partial) 251.3
    • Hypoinsulinemia, postsurgical 251.3
      • postpancreatectomy (complete) (partial) 251.3
    • Postpancreatectomy hyperglycemia 251.3

Information for Patients

After Surgery

Also called: Postoperative care, Recovery from surgery

After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around the area that the surgeon cut. Your surgeon can tell you which side effects to expect.

There can also be complications. These are unplanned events linked to the operation. Some complications are infection, too much bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions.

Your surgeon can tell you how you might feel and what you will be able to do - or not do - the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are

  • How long you will be in the hospital
  • What kind of supplies, equipment, and help you might need when you go home
  • When you can go back to work
  • When it is ok to start exercising again
  • Are they any other restrictions in your activities

Following your surgeon's advice can help you recover as soon as possible.

Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research

  • Bland diet
  • Deep breathing after surgery
  • Diet - clear liquid
  • Diet - full liquid
  • Getting your home ready - after the hospital
  • Hemorrhoid removal -- discharge
  • Indwelling catheter care
  • Post surgical pain treatment - adults
  • Preparing for surgery when you have diabetes
  • Self catheterization - female
  • Self catheterization - male
  • Sternal exploration or closure
  • Suprapubic catheter care
  • Surgical wound care -- closed
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment
  • The day of surgery for your child
  • The day of your surgery - adult
  • Tracheostomy tube - eating
  • Tracheostomy tube - speaking
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urine drainage bags
  • Using an incentive spirometer

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Also called: Low blood sugar

Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose.

In most people, this raises blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. Signs include

  • Hunger
  • Shakiness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Feeling anxious or weak

In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia is often a side effect of diabetes medicines. Eating or drinking something with carbohydrates can help. If it happens often, your health care provider may need to change your treatment plan.

You can also have low blood sugar without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care
  • Drug-induced hypoglycemia
  • Insulin C-peptide
  • Low blood sugar
  • Low blood sugar - newborns

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