ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 228.03

Hemangioma retina

Diagnosis Code 228.03

ICD-9: 228.03
Short Description: Hemangioma retina
Long Description: Hemangioma of retina
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 228.03

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • Benign neoplasms (210-229)
      • 228 Hemangioma and lymphangioma, any site

Information for Patients

Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign cancer, Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. When these extra cells form a mass, it is called a tumor.

Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps
  • Cherry angioma

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Also called: Cafe au lait spot, Hemangioma, Mongolian spot, Nevus, Strawberry mark

Birthmarks are abnormalities of the skin that are present when a baby is born. There are two types of birthmarks. Vascular birthmarks are made up of blood vessels that haven't formed correctly. They are usually red. Two types of vascular birthmarks are hemangiomas and port-wine stains. Pigmented birthmarks are made of a cluster of pigment cells which cause color in skin. They can be many different colors, from tan to brown, gray to black, or even blue. Moles can be birthmarks.

No one knows what causes many types of birthmarks, but some run in families. Your baby's doctor will look at the birthmark to see if it needs any treatment or if it should be watched. Pigmented birthmarks aren't usually treated, except for moles. Treatment for vascular birthmarks includes laser surgery.

Most birthmarks are not serious, and some go away on their own. Some stay the same or get worse as you get older. Usually birthmarks are only a concern for your appearance. But certain types can increase your risk of skin cancer. If your birthmark bleeds, hurts, itches, or becomes infected, call your health care provider.

  • Birthmarks - pigmented
  • Birthmarks - red
  • Cherry angioma
  • Hemangioma
  • Mongolian blue spots
  • Port-wine stain
  • Stork bite

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Retinal Disorders

The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. In the center of this nerve tissue is the macula. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving and seeing fine detail.

Retinal disorders affect this vital tissue. They can affect your vision, and some can be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are

  • Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision
  • Diabetic eye disease
  • Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is pulled away from the back of the eye
  • Retinoblastoma - cancer of the retina. It is most common in young children.
  • Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula
  • Macular hole - a small break in the macula that usually happens to people over 60
  • Floaters - cobwebs or specks in your field of vision

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Amaurosis fugax
  • Central serous choroidopathy
  • Electroretinography
  • Fluorescein angiography
  • High blood pressure and eye disease
  • Home vision tests
  • Intravitreal injection
  • Ophthalmoscopy
  • Retinal artery occlusion
  • Retinal vein occlusion
  • Retinitis pigmentosa
  • Retinopathy of prematurity
  • Slit-lamp exam
  • Standard ophthalmic exam

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