ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 139.8

Late eff infect dis NEC

Diagnosis Code 139.8

ICD-9: 139.8
Short Description: Late eff infect dis NEC
Long Description: Late effects of other and unspecified infectious and parasitic diseases
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 139.8

Code Classification
  • Infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Late effects of infectious and parasitic diseases (137-139)
      • 139 Late effects of other infectious and parasitic diseases

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Infectious sequelae of disorders
  • Persistent cough after viral respiratory infection
  • Post-infectious disorder
  • Post-infective pleural fibrosis
  • Post-influenza encephalitis
  • Post-scabetic nodules
  • Post-streptococcal disorder
  • Post-viral disorder
  • Sequelae of infectious and parasitic diseases
  • Sequelae of leprosy
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with infection

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 139.8 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Actinomycosis
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Blood culture
  • Gram stain
  • Gram stain of skin lesion
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection
  • Q fever
  • Serology for tularemia
  • Shigellosis
  • Stool Gram stain
  • Tularemia

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Parasitic Diseases

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not.

Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world.

If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.

  • Amebiasis
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Ascariasis
  • Creeping eruption
  • Rectal culture
  • Stool ova and parasites exam
  • Taeniasis
  • Visceral larva migrans

[Read More]
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