ICD-9 Code 676.13

Cracked nipple associated with childbirth, antepartum condition or complication

Not Valid for Submission

676.13 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of cracked nipple associated with childbirth, antepartum condition or complication. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 676.13
Short Description:Cracked nipple-antepart
Long Description:Cracked nipple associated with childbirth, antepartum condition or complication

Convert 676.13 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • O92.111 - Cracked nipple associated with pregnancy, first trimester
  • O92.112 - Cracked nipple associated with pregnancy, second trimester
  • O92.113 - Cracked nipple associated with pregnancy, third trimester

Code Classification

  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (630–679)
    • Complications of the puerperium (670-677)
      • 676 Other disorders of the breast associated with childbirth, and disorders of lactation

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-9 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

Information for Patients


Breast Diseases

Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk).

If you have a breast lump, pain, discharge or skin irritation, see your health care provider. Minor and serious breast problems have similar symptoms. Although many women fear cancer, most breast problems are not cancer.

Some common breast changes are

  • Fibrocystic breast changes - lumpiness, thickening and swelling, often just before a woman's period
  • Cysts - fluid-filled lumps
  • Fibroadenomas - solid, round, rubbery lumps that move easily when pushed, occurring most in younger women
  • Intraductal papillomas - growths similar to warts near the nipple
  • Blocked milk ducts
  • Milk production when a woman is not breastfeeding

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Breast - premenstrual tenderness and swelling
  • Breast biopsy -- stereotactic
  • Breast biopsy -- ultrasound
  • Breast infection
  • Breast lump
  • Breast MRI scan
  • Breast pain
  • Breast self exam
  • Breast skin and nipple changes
  • Breast ultrasound
  • Fibroadenoma - breast
  • Fibrocystic breast disease
  • Gynecomastia
  • Intraductal papilloma
  • Nipple problems
  • Subareolar abscess
  • Supernumerary nipples

[Read More]

Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Losing weight after pregnancy
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.