ICD-9 Code 655.81

Other known or suspected fetal abnormality, not elsewhere classified, affecting management of mother, delivered, with or without mention of antepartum condition

Not Valid for Submission

655.81 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other known or suspected fetal abnormality, not elsewhere classified, affecting management of mother, delivered, with or without mention of antepartum condition. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 655.81
Short Description:Fetal abnorm NEC-deliver
Long Description:Other known or suspected fetal abnormality, not elsewhere classified, affecting management of mother, delivered, with or without mention of antepartum condition

Convert 655.81 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • O35.8XX0 - Maternal care for oth fetal abnormality and damage, unsp

Code Classification

  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (630–679)
    • Normal delivery, and other indications for care in pregnancy, labor, and delivery (650-659)
      • 655 Known or suspected fetal abnormality affecting management of mother

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-9 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

Synonyms

  • Fetus with damage due to intrauterine contraceptive device - delivered

Information for Patients


Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some result from exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome. Infections during pregnancy can also result in birth defects. For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Some birth defects can be prevented. Taking folic acid can help prevent some birth defects. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take. Some medicines can cause serious birth defects.

Babies with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Intersex

[Read More]

Fetal Health and Development

A normal pregnancy lasts nine months. Each three-month period of pregnancy is called a trimester. During each trimester, the fetus grows and develops. There are specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester.

With modern technology, health professionals can

  • Detect birth defects
  • Identify problems that may affect childbirth
  • Correct some kinds of fetal problems before the baby is born
  • Developmental disorders of the female reproductive tract
  • Fetal development
  • Intrauterine growth restriction

[Read More]

Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Losing weight after pregnancy
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.