ICD-9 Code 535.51

Unspecified gastritis and gastroduodenitis, with hemorrhage

Not Valid for Submission

535.51 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of unspecified gastritis and gastroduodenitis, with hemorrhage. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 535.51
Short Description:Gstr/ddnts NOS w hmrhg
Long Description:Unspecified gastritis and gastroduodenitis, with hemorrhage

Convert 535.51 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • K29.71 - Gastritis, unspecified, with bleeding
  • K29.91 - Gastroduodenitis, unspecified, with bleeding

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the digestive system (520–579)
    • Diseases of esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (530-539)
      • 535 Gastritis and duodenitis

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Also called: GI bleeding

Your digestive or gastrointestinal (GI) tract includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine or colon, rectum, and anus. Bleeding can come from any of these areas. The amount of bleeding can be so small that only a lab test can find it.

Signs of bleeding in the digestive tract depend where it is and how much bleeding there is.

Signs of bleeding in the upper digestive tract include

  • Bright red blood in vomit
  • Vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • Black or tarry stool
  • Dark blood mixed with stool

Signs of bleeding in the lower digestive tract include

  • Black or tarry stool
  • Dark blood mixed with stool
  • Stool mixed or coated with bright red blood

GI bleeding is not a disease, but a symptom of a disease. There are many possible causes of GI bleeding, including hemorrhoids, peptic ulcers, tears or inflammation in the esophagus, diverticulosis and diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, colonic polyps, or cancer in the colon, stomach or esophagus.

The test used most often to look for the cause of GI bleeding is called endoscopy. It uses a flexible instrument inserted through the mouth or rectum to view the inside of the GI tract. A type of endoscopy called colonoscopy looks at the large intestine.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bleeding esophageal varices
  • Bloody or tarry stools
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Mallory-Weiss tear
  • Mesenteric angiography
  • RBC nuclear scan
  • Stool guaiac test
  • Vomiting blood

[Read More]

Stomach Disorders

Also called: Gastric disorders

Your stomach is an organ between your esophagus and small intestine. It is where digestion of protein begins. The stomach has three tasks. It stores swallowed food. It mixes the food with stomach acids. Then it sends the mixture on to the small intestine.

Most people have a problem with their stomach at one time or another. Indigestion and heartburn are common problems. You can relieve some stomach problems with over-the-counter medicines and lifestyle changes, such as avoiding fatty foods or eating more slowly. Other problems like peptic ulcers or GERD require medical attention.

You should see a doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Blood when you have a bowel movement
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Heartburn not relieved by antacids
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Ongoing vomiting or diarrhea

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bezoar
  • Dumping Syndrome - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Gastrectomy
  • Gastritis
  • Gastroparesis
  • Pyloric stenosis
  • Pyloroplasty
  • Stomach acid test
  • Upper GI and small bowel series

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.