ICD-9 Code 488.11

Influenza due to identified 2009 H1N1 influenza virus with pneumonia

Not Valid for Submission

488.11 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of influenza due to identified 2009 h1n1 influenza virus with pneumonia. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

ICD-9: 488.11
Short Description:Flu dt 2009 H1N1 w pneu
Long Description:Influenza due to identified 2009 H1N1 influenza virus with pneumonia

Convert 488.11 to ICD-10

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • J10.08 - Influenza due to oth ident influenza virus w oth pneumonia

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the respiratory system (460–519)
    • Pneumonia and influenza (480-488)
      • 488 Influenza due to identified avian influenza virus

Information for Medical Professionals

Index to Diseases and Injuries

References found for the code 488.11 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

    • Influenza influenzal 487.1
      • due to identified
        • novel 2009 H1N1 influenza virus 488.12
          • with
            • pneumonia 488.11
      • novel 2009 H1N1 488.12
        • bronchopneumonia 488.11
        • pneumonia any form classifiable to 480 483 485 486 488.11
    • Pneumonia acute Alpenstich benign bilateral brain cerebral circumscribed congestive creeping delayed resolution double epidemic fever flash fulminant fungoid granulomatous hemorrhagic incipient infantile infectious infiltration insular intermittent latent lobe migratory newborn organized overwhelming primary progressive pseudolobar purulent resolved secondary senile septic suppurative terminal true unresolved vesicular 486
      • with influenza flu or grippe 487.0
        • due to
          • identified virus
            • novel 2009 H1N1 488.11
      • broncho bronchial confluent croupous diffuse disseminated hemorrhagic involving lobes lobar terminal 485
        • with influenza 487.0
          • due to
            • identified virus
              • novel 2009 H1N1 488.11

Information for Patients


H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)

Also called: Swine flu

Swine flu is an infection caused by a virus. It's named for a virus that pigs can get. People do not normally get swine flu, but human infections can and do happen. In 2009 a strain of swine flu called H1N1 infected many people around the world.

The virus is contagious and can spread from human to human. Symptoms of swine flu in people are similar to the symptoms of regular human flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.

There are antiviral medicines you can take to prevent or treat swine flu. There is a vaccine available to protect against swine flu. You can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza by

  • Covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Washing your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. You can also use alcohol-based hand cleaners.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Trying to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Staying home from work or school if you are sick.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • College students and the flu
  • H1N1 (swine) influenza
  • Pregnancy and the flu
  • Your baby and the flu
  • Your child and the flu

[Read More]

Pneumonia

Also called: Bronchopneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of the lungs. Many germs, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can cause pneumonia. You can also get pneumonia by inhaling a liquid or chemical. People most at risk are older than 65 or younger than 2 years of age, or already have health problems.

Symptoms of pneumonia vary from mild to severe. See your doctor promptly if you

  • Have a high fever
  • Have shaking chills
  • Have a cough with phlegm that doesn't improve or gets worse
  • Develop shortness of breath with normal daily activities
  • Have chest pain when you breathe or cough
  • Feel suddenly worse after a cold or the flu

Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to treat it.

Preventing pneumonia is always better than treating it. Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu. Other preventive measures include washing your hands frequently and not smoking.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Aspiration pneumonia
  • Atypical pneumonia
  • Hospital-acquired pneumonia
  • Mycoplasma pneumonia
  • Pneumonia
  • Pneumonia - adults - discharge
  • Pneumonia - children - discharge
  • Routine sputum culture
  • Viral pneumonia

[Read More]

ICD-9 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

  • And - The word "and" should be interpreted to mean either "and" or "or" when it appears in a title.
  • Code also note - A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes - A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Type 2 Excludes Notes - A type 2 Excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • Includes Notes - This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Inclusion terms - List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • NEC "Not elsewhere classifiable" - This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents "other specified". When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the "other specified” code in the Tabular List.
  • NOS "Not otherwise specified" - This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
  • See - The "see" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the "see" note to locate the correct code.
  • See Also - A "see also" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the "see also" note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
  • 7th Characters - Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • With - The word "with" should be interpreted to mean "associated with" or "due to" when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word "with" in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.