ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z79.82

Long term (current) use of aspirin

Diagnosis Code Z79.82

ICD-10: Z79.82
Short Description: Long term (current) use of aspirin
Long Description: Long term (current) use of aspirin
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z79.82

Valid for Submission
The code Z79.82 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Long term (current) drug therapy (Z79)

Information for Patients


Blood Thinners

Also called: Anti-platelet drugs, Anticoagulants

Blood thinners are medicines that prevent blood clots from forming. They also keep existing blood clots from getting larger. Clots in your arteries, veins, and heart can cause heart attacks, strokes, and blockages. You may take a blood thinner if you have

  • Certain heart or blood vessel diseases
  • An abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation
  • A heart valve replacement
  • A risk of blood clots after surgery
  • Congenital heart defects

There are two main types of blood thinners. Anticoagulants such as heparin or warfarin (also called Coumadin) slow down your body's process of making clots. Antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin, prevent blood cells called platelets from clumping together to form a clot.

When you take a blood thinner, follow directions carefully. Blood thinners may interact with certain foods, medicines, vitamins, and alcohol. Make sure that your healthcare provider knows all of the medicines and supplements you are using. You will probably need regular blood tests to check how well your blood is clotting. It is important to make sure that you're taking enough medicine to prevent clots, but not so much that it causes bleeding.

  • Aspirin and heart disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Clopidogrel (Plavix) (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How to give a heparin shot (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Taking warfarin (Coumadin) (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Pain Relievers

Also called: Analgesics, Pain killers, Pain medicines

Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There are many different pain medicines, and each one has advantages and risks. Some types of pain respond better to certain medicines than others. Each person may also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for many types of pain. There are two main types of OTC pain medicines: acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin, naproxen (Aleve), and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) are examples of OTC NSAIDs.

If OTC medicines don't relieve your pain, your doctor may prescribe something stronger. Many NSAIDs are also available at higher prescription doses. The most powerful pain relievers are opioids. They are very effective, but they can sometimes have serious side effects. There is also a risk of addiction. Because of the risks, you must use them only under a doctor's supervision.

There are many things you can do to help ease pain. Pain relievers are just one part of a pain treatment plan.

  • Acetaminophen dosing for children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ibuprofen dosing for children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pain medications - narcotics (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Taking narcotics for back pain (Medical Encyclopedia)


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