ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T37.0X2

Poisoning by sulfonamides, intentional self-harm

Diagnosis Code T37.0X2

ICD-10: T37.0X2
Short Description: Poisoning by sulfonamides, intentional self-harm
Long Description: Poisoning by sulfonamides, intentional self-harm
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T37.0X2

Not Valid for Submission
The code T37.0X2 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Systemic anti- infectives and antiparasitics (T37)

Information for Medical Professionals

Synonyms
  • Intentional sulfadiazine poisoning
  • Intentional sulfafurazole poisoning
  • Intentional sulfamethoxazole poisoning
  • Poisoning caused by sulfadiazine
  • Poisoning caused by sulfafurazole
  • Poisoning caused by sulfamethoxazole

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T37.0X2 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
AcedapsoneT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
AcesulfamethoxypyridazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
AcetylsulfamethoxypyridazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
AzosulfamideT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
AzulfidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
DiaphenylsulfoneT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
DisulfanilamideT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
NeoprontosilT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
PhthalylsulfathiazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
ProntosilT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SalazosulfapyridineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SalicylazosulfapyridineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SuccinylsulfathiazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfachlorpyridazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfacitineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfadiasulfone sodiumT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfadiazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfadiazine
  »silver (topical)
T37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfadimethoxineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfadimidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfadoxineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfadoxine
  »with pyrimethamine
T37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaethidoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfafurazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaguanidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaleneT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaloxateT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfaloxic acidT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamerazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfameterT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamethazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamethizoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamethoxazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfamethoxazole
  »with trimethoprim
T37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamethoxydiazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamethoxypyridazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamethylthiazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfametoxydiazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamonomethoxineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfamoxoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfanilamideT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfanilylguanidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaperinT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaphenazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaphenylthiazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfaproxylineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfapyridineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfapyrimidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfasalazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfasuxidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfasymazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfathiazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfisomidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulfisoxazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfisoxazole
  »ophthalmic preparation
T37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfonamide NECT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
Sulfonamide NEC
  »eye
T37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphadiazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphadimethoxineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphadimidineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphafurazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphamethizoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphamethoxazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphaphenazoleT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphapyridineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
SulphasalazineT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6
TrisulfapyrimidinesT37.0X1T37.0X2T37.0X3T37.0X4T37.0X5T37.0X6

Information for Patients


Antibiotics

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or keep them from reproducing. Your body's natural defenses can usually take it from there.

Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such as

  • Colds
  • Flu
  • Most coughs and bronchitis
  • Sore throats, unless caused by strep

If a virus is making you sick, taking antibiotics may do more harm than good. Using antibiotics when you don't need them, or not using them properly, can add to antibiotic resistance. This happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic.

When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. It is important to finish your medicine even if you feel better. If you stop treatment too soon, some bacteria may survive and re-infect you. Do not save antibiotics for later or use someone else's prescription.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Central venous catheters - ports (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Poisoning

A poison is any substance that is harmful to your body. You might swallow it, inhale it, inject it, or absorb it through your skin. Any substance can be poisonous if too much is taken. Poisons can include

  • Prescription or over-the-counter medicines taken in doses that are too high
  • Overdoses of illegal drugs
  • Carbon monoxide from gas appliances
  • Household products, such as laundry powder or furniture polish
  • Pesticides
  • Indoor or outdoor plants
  • Metals such as lead and mercury

The effects of poisoning range from short-term illness to brain damage, coma, and death. To prevent poisoning it is important to use and store products exactly as their labels say. Keep dangerous products where children can't get to them. Treatment for poisoning depends on the type of poison. If you suspect someone has been poisoned, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away.

  • Poisoning (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Poisoning first aid (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxicology screen (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Self-harm

Self-harm refers to a person's harming their own body on purpose. About 1 in 100 people hurts himself or herself in this way. More females hurt themselves than males. A person who self-harms usually does not mean to kill himself or herself. But they are at higher risk of attempting suicide if they do not get help.

Self-harm tends to begin in teen or early adult years. Some people may engage in self-harm a few times and then stop. Others engage in it more often and have trouble stopping.

Examples of self-harm include

  • Cutting yourself (such as using a razor blade, knife, or other sharp object to cut the skin)
  • Punching yourself or punching things (like a wall)
  • Burning yourself with cigarettes, matches, or candles
  • Pulling out your hair
  • Poking objects through body openings
  • Breaking your bones or bruising yourself

Many people cut themselves because it gives them a sense of relief. Some people use cutting as a means to cope with a problem. Some teens say that when they hurt themselves, they are trying to stop feeling lonely, angry, or hopeless.

It is possible to overcome the urge to hurt yourself. There are other ways to find relief and cope with your emotions. Counseling may help.

Dept. of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health

  • Trichotillomania (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]
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