ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R04.2

Hemoptysis

Diagnosis Code R04.2

ICD-10: R04.2
Short Description: Hemoptysis
Long Description: Hemoptysis
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R04.2

Valid for Submission
The code R04.2 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00-R09)
      • Hemorrhage from respiratory passages (R04)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.
Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Blood in sputum O/E
  • Blood streaked sputum
  • Bloodstained sputum
  • Frank blood in sputum
  • Hemoptysis
  • On examination - sputum
  • Sputum: contains blood

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code R04.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Bleeding

Also called: Hematoma, Hemorrhage

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen outside or inside the body. You may bleed when you get a cut or other wound. Bleeding can also be due to an injury to internal organs.

Sometimes bleeding can cause other problems. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease.

Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.

  • Bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bleeding gums (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bleeding into the skin (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Cough

Coughing is a reflex that keeps your throat and airways clear. Although it can be annoying, coughing helps your body heal or protect itself. Coughs can be either acute or chronic. Acute coughs begin suddenly and usually last no more than 2 to 3 weeks. Acute coughs are the kind you most often get with a cold, flu, or acute bronchitis. Chronic coughs last longer than 2 to 3 weeks. Causes of chronic cough include

  • Chronic bronchitis
  • Asthma
  • Allergies
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease)
  • Smoking
  • Throat disorders, such as croup in young children
  • Some medicines

Water can help ease your cough - whether you drink it or add it to the air with a steamy shower or vaporizer. If you have a cold or the flu, antihistamines may work better than non-prescription cough medicines. Children under four should not have cough medicine. For children over four, use caution and read labels carefully.

  • Cough (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Coughing up blood (Medical Encyclopedia)


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