ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E77.0

Defects in post-translational mod of lysosomal enzymes

Diagnosis Code E77.0

ICD-10: E77.0
Short Description: Defects in post-translational mod of lysosomal enzymes
Long Description: Defects in post-translational modification of lysosomal enzymes
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E77.0

Valid for Submission
The code E77.0 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disorders of glycoprotein metabolism (E77)

Information for Patients


Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat.

A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy.

You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example.

  • Acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Alkalosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lactic acid test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metabolic acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metabolic neuropathies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pseudohypoparathyroidism (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Mucolipidosis III gamma Mucolipidosis III gamma is a slowly progressive disorder that affects many parts of the body. Signs and symptoms of this condition typically appear around age 3.Individuals with mucolipidosis III gamma grow slowly and have short stature. They also have stiff joints and dysostosis multiplex, which refers to multiple skeletal abnormalities seen on x-ray. Many affected individuals develop low bone mineral density (osteoporosis), which weakens the bones and makes them prone to fracture. Osteoporosis and progressive joint problems in people with mucolipidosis III gamma also cause pain, which becomes more severe over time.People with mucolipidosis III gamma often have heart valve abnormalities and mild clouding of the clear covering of the eye (cornea). Their facial features become slightly thickened or "coarse" as they get older. A small percentage of people with this condition have mild intellectual disability or learning problems. Individuals with mucolipidosis III gamma generally survive into adulthood, but they may have a shortened lifespan.
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Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta is a disorder that affects many parts of the body. Signs and symptoms of this condition typically appear around age 3 and worsen slowly over time.Individuals with mucolipidosis III alpha/beta grow slowly and have short stature. They also have stiff joints and dysostosis multiplex, which refers to multiple skeletal abnormalities seen on x-ray. Many affected individuals develop low bone mineral density (osteoporosis), which weakens the bones and makes them prone to fracture. Osteoporosis and progressive joint problems also cause bone pain that becomes more severe over time in people with mucolipidosis III alpha/beta.People with mucolipidosis III alpha/beta often have heart valve abnormalities and mild clouding of the clear covering of the eye (cornea). Their facial features become slightly thickened or "coarse" over time. Affected individuals may also develop frequent ear and respiratory infections. About half of people with this condition have mild intellectual disability or learning problems. Individuals with mucolipidosis III alpha/beta generally survive into adulthood, but they may have a shortened lifespan.
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Mucolipidosis II alpha/beta Mucolipidosis II alpha/beta (also known as I-cell disease) is a progressively debilitating disorder that affects many parts of the body. Most affected individuals do not survive past early childhood.At birth, children with mucolipidosis II alpha/beta are small and have weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and a weak cry. Affected individuals grow slowly after birth and usually stop growing during the second year of life. Development is delayed, particularly the development of speech and motor skills such as sitting and standing.Children with mucolipidosis II alpha/beta typically have several bone abnormalities, many of which are present at birth. Affected individuals may have an abnormally rounded upper back (kyphosis), feet that are abnormally rotated (clubfeet), dislocated hips, unusually shaped long bones, and short hands and fingers. People with this condition also have joint deformities (contractures) that significantly affect mobility. Most children with mucolipidosis II alpha/beta do not develop the ability to walk independently. Affected individuals have dysostosis multiplex, which refers to multiple skeletal abnormalities seen on x-ray.Other features of mucolipidosis II alpha/beta include a soft out-pouching around the belly-button (umbilical hernia) or lower abdomen (inguinal hernia), heart valve abnormalities, distinctive-looking facial features that are described as "coarse," and overgrowth of the gums (gingival hypertrophy). Vocal cords can stiffen, resulting in a hoarse voice. The airway is narrow, which can contribute to prolonged or recurrent respiratory infections. Affected individuals may also have recurrent ear infections, which can lead to hearing loss.
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