ICD-10-CM Code Z96.63

Presence of artificial wrist joint

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

Z96.63 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of presence of artificial wrist joint. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:Z96.63
Short Description:Presence of artificial wrist joint
Long Description:Presence of artificial wrist joint

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • Z96.631 - Presence of right artificial wrist joint
  • Z96.632 - Presence of left artificial wrist joint
  • Z96.639 - Presence of unspecified artificial wrist joint

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code Z96.63 are found in the index:


Code Classification

  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Presence of other functional implants (Z96)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Artificial Limbs

People can lose all or part of an arm or leg for a number of reasons. Common ones include

  • Circulation problems from atherosclerosis or diabetes. They may cause you to need an amputation.
  • Traumatic injuries, including from traffic accidents and military combat
  • Cancer
  • Birth defects

If you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is called a prosthesis, can help you to perform daily activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as before.


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