ICD-10-CM Code Z87.7

Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

Z87.7 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:Z87.7
Short Description:Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations
Long Description:Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • Z87.71 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of genitourinary system
  • Z87.710 - Personal history of (corrected) hypospadias
  • Z87.718 - Personal history of other specified (corrected) congenital malformations of genitourinary system
  • Z87.72 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of nervous system and sense organs
  • Z87.720 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of eye
  • Z87.721 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of ear
  • Z87.728 - Personal history of other specified (corrected) congenital malformations of nervous system and sense organs
  • Z87.73 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of digestive system
  • Z87.730 - Personal history of (corrected) cleft lip and palate
  • Z87.738 - Personal history of other specified (corrected) congenital malformations of digestive system
  • Z87.74 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of heart and circulatory system
  • Z87.75 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of respiratory system
  • Z87.76 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of integument, limbs and musculoskeletal system
  • Z87.79 - Personal history of other (corrected) congenital malformations
  • Z87.790 - Personal history of (corrected) congenital malformations of face and neck
  • Z87.798 - Personal history of other (corrected) congenital malformations

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code Z87.7:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Conditions classifiable to Q00 Q89

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • congenital malformations that have been partially corrected or repair but which still require medical treatment - code to condition

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • other postprocedural states Z98
  • personal history of medical treatment Z92
  • presence of cardiac and vascular implants and grafts Z95
  • presence of other devices Z97
  • presence of other functional implants Z96
  • transplanted organ and tissue status Z94

Code Classification

  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Personal history of other diseases and conditions (Z87)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can range from mild to severe. Causes can include

  • Genetics
  • Exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome.
  • Infections during pregnancy
  • Certain medicines. Before you get pregnant, talk to your health care provider about any medicines you take.
  • Not getting enough of certain nutrients. For example, not getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy is a key factor in causing neural tube defects.

For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Health care providers can diagnose certain birth defects during pregnancy, with prenatal tests. That's why it important to get regular prenatal care. Other birth defects may not be found until after the baby is born. Sometimes the defect is obvious right away. Other times, the health care provider may not discover it until later in life.

Babies with birth defects often need special care and treatments. The treatments may include surgery, medicines, assistive devices, and therapies.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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