ICD-10-CM Code Z85.2

Personal history of malignant neoplasm of other respiratory and intrathoracic organs

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

Z85.2 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of personal history of malignant neoplasm of other respiratory and intrathoracic organs. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:Z85.2
Short Description:Prsnl history of malig neoplm of resp and intrathorac organs
Long Description:Personal history of malignant neoplasm of other respiratory and intrathoracic organs

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • Z85.20 - Personal history of malignant neoplasm of unspecified respiratory organ
  • Z85.21 - Personal history of malignant neoplasm of larynx
  • Z85.22 - Personal history of malignant neoplasm of nasal cavities, middle ear, and accessory sinuses
  • Z85.23 - Personal history of malignant neoplasm of thymus
  • Z85.230 - Personal history of malignant carcinoid tumor of thymus
  • Z85.238 - Personal history of other malignant neoplasm of thymus
  • Z85.29 - Personal history of malignant neoplasm of other respiratory and intrathoracic organs

Code Classification

  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Personal history of malignant neoplasm (Z85)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Head and Neck Cancer

Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the neck. Most begin in the moist tissues that line the mouth, nose, and throat. Symptoms include

  • A lump or sore that does not heal
  • A sore throat that does not go away
  • Trouble swallowing
  • A change or hoarseness in the voice

Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using tobacco or alcohol increases your risk. In fact, around 75 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking and smokeless tobacco. Infection with HPV is a risk factor for some head and neck cancers.

To diagnose head and neck cancer, your doctor will do a physical exam and diagnostic tests. You will have a biopsy, where a sample of tissue is taken out and examined under a microscope. It is the only test that can tell for sure if you have cancer.

If found early, these cancers are often curable. Treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. Treatments can affect eating, speaking or even breathing, so patients may need rehabilitation.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


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