T88.1XXA - Other complications following immunization, not elsewhere classified, initial encounter

Version 2023
ICD-10:T88.1XXA
Short Description:Oth complications following immunization, NEC, init
Long Description:Other complications following immunization, not elsewhere classified, initial encounter
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Complications of surgical and medical care, not elsewhere classified (T80-T88)
      • Oth complications of surgical and medical care, NEC (T88)

T88.1XXA is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other complications following immunization, not elsewhere classified, initial encounter. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

T88.1XXA is an initial encounter code, includes a 7th character and should be used while the patient is receiving active treatment for a condition like other complications following immunization not elsewhere classified. According to ICD-10-CM Guidelines an "initial encounter" doesn't necessarily means "initial visit". The 7th character should be used when the patient is undergoing active treatment regardless if new or different providers saw the patient over the course of a treatment. The appropriate 7th character codes should also be used even if the patient delayed seeking treatment for a condition.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Coding Guidelines

The appropriate 7th character is to be added to each code from block Oth complications of surgical and medical care, NEC (T88). Use the following options for the aplicable episode of care:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
T88.1XXA999.0 - Generalized vaccinia
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Patient Education


Vaccines

What are vaccines?

Vaccines are injections (shots), liquids, pills, or nasal sprays that you take to teach your body's immune system to recognize and defend against harmful germs. For example, there are vaccines to protect against diseases caused by:

What are the types of vaccines?

There are several types of vaccines:

Vaccines work in different ways, but they all spark an immune response. The immune response is the way your body defends itself against substances it sees as foreign or harmful. These substances include germs that can cause disease.

What happens in an immune response?

There are different steps in the immune response:

What are immunization and vaccination?

Immunization is the process of becoming protected against a disease. But it can also mean the same thing as vaccination, which is getting a vaccine to become protected against a disease.

Why are vaccines important?

Vaccines are important because they protect you against many diseases. These diseases can be very serious. So getting immunity from a vaccine is safer than getting immunity by being sick with the disease. And for a few vaccines, getting vaccinated can actually give you a better immune response than getting the disease would.

But vaccines don't just protect you. They also protect the people around you through community immunity.

What is community immunity?

Community immunity, or herd immunity, is the idea that vaccines can help keep communities healthy.

Normally, germs can travel quickly through a community and make a lot of people sick. If enough people get sick, it can lead to an outbreak. But when enough people are vaccinated against a certain disease, it's harder for that disease to spread to others. This type of protection means that the entire community is less likely to get the disease.

Community immunity is especially important for people who can't get certain vaccines. For example, they may not be able to get a vaccine because they have weakened immune systems. Others may be allergic to certain vaccine ingredients. And newborn babies are too young to get some vaccines. Community immunity can help to protect them all.

Are vaccines safe?

Vaccines are safe. They must go through extensive safety testing and evaluation before they are approved in the United States.

What is a vaccine schedule?

A vaccine, or immunization, schedule lists which vaccines are recommended for different groups of people. It includes who should get the vaccines, how many doses they need, and when they should get them. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes the vaccine schedule.

It's important for both children and adults to get their vaccines according to the schedule. Following the schedule allows them to get protection from the diseases at exactly the right time.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History