ICD-10 Code T80.52XS

Anaphylactic reaction due to vaccination, sequela

Version 2019 Billable Code POA Exempt
ICD-10: T80.52XS
Short Description:Anaphylactic reaction due to vaccination, sequela
Long Description:Anaphylactic reaction due to vaccination, sequela

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 T80.52XS is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction due to vaccination, sequela. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Complications of surgical and medical care, not elsewhere classified (T80-T88)
      • Comp following infusion, transfusion and theraputc injection (T80)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert T80.52XS to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 909.3 - Late eff surg/med compl (Approximate Flag)

Present on Admission (POA)

T80.52XS is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Adverse reaction to diphtheria vaccine
  • Adverse reaction to human papillomavirus vaccine
  • Adverse reaction to meningococcal vaccine
  • Adverse reaction to rotavirus vaccine
  • Adverse reaction to tetanus vaccine
  • Adverse reaction to tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to diphtheria and tetanus vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to Hemophilus influenzae type b vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to Hepatitis B vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to human papillomavirus vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to meningococcal vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to rotavirus vaccine
  • Anaphylaxis due to tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine
  • Diphtheria and tetanus vaccine adverse reaction
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine adverse reaction
  • Haemophilus influenzae Type B vaccine adverse reaction
  • Hepatitis B vaccine adverse reaction
  • Pertussis vaccine adverse reaction

Information for Patients


Anaphylaxis

Also called: Anaphylactic shock

Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction. It can begin very quickly, and symptoms may be life-threatening. The most common causes are reactions to foods (especially peanuts), medications, and stinging insects. Other causes include exercise and exposure to latex. Sometimes no cause can be found.

It can affect many organs:

  • Skin - itching, hives, redness, swelling
  • Nose - sneezing, stuffy nose, runny nose
  • Mouth - itching, swelling of the lips or tongue
  • Throat - itching, tightness, trouble swallowing, swelling of the back of the throat
  • Chest - shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, chest pain or tightness
  • Heart - weak pulse, passing out, shock
  • Gastrointestinal tract - vomiting, diarrhea, cramps
  • Nervous system - dizziness or fainting

If someone is having a serious allergic reaction, call 9-1-1. If an auto-injector is available, give the person the injection right away.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


[Learn More]

Drug Reactions

Also called: Side effects

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions.

One problem is interactions, which may occur between

  • Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners
  • Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit
  • Drugs and supplements, such as ginkgo and blood thinners
  • Drugs and diseases, such as aspirin and peptic ulcers

Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects.

Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the drugs. Most are mild, such as a stomach aches or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the drug. Others can be more serious.

Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type. Anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction, is more rare.

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medications and foods you need to avoid. Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

  • Angioedema (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Drug allergies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Drug-induced diarrhea (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Drug-induced tremor (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Taking multiple medicines safely (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Immunization

Also called: Vaccination

Shots may hurt a little, but the diseases they can prevent are a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children.

Your immune system helps your body fight germs by producing substances to combat them. Once it does, the immune system "remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus build immunity.

Before vaccines, people became immune only by actually getting a disease and surviving it. Immunizations are an easier and less risky way to become immune.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Immunizations - diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.