ICD-10-CM Code T78.3

Angioneurotic edema

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

T78.3 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of angioneurotic edema. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:T78.3
Short Description:Angioneurotic edema
Long Description:Angioneurotic edema

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code T78.3:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Allergic angioedema
  • Giant urticaria
  • Quincke's edema

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code T78.3 are found in the index:


Clinical Information

  • ANGIOEDEMA-. swelling involving the deep dermis subcutaneous or submucosal tissues representing localized edema. angioedema often occurs in the face lips tongue and larynx.
  • ANGIOEDEMAS HEREDITARY-. inherited disorders that are characterized by subcutaneous and submucosal edema in the upper respiratory tract and gastrointestinal tract.
  • HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA TYPE III-. a form of hereditary angioedema that occurs in women and is precipitated or worsened by high estrogen levels. it is associated with mutations in the gene for factor xii that result in its increased activity.

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Other and unspecified effects of external causes (T66-T78)
      • Adverse effects, not elsewhere classified (T78)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Allergy

An allergy is a reaction by your immune system to something that does not bother most other people. People who have allergies often are sensitive to more than one thing. Substances that often cause reactions are

  • Pollen
  • Dust mites
  • Mold spores
  • Pet dander
  • Food
  • Insect stings
  • Medicines

Normally, your immune system fights germs. It is your body's defense system. In most allergic reactions, however, it is responding to a false alarm. Genes and the environment probably both play a role.

Allergies can cause a variety of symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, itching, rashes, swelling, or asthma. Allergies can range from minor to severe. Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction that can be life-threatening. Doctors use skin and blood tests to diagnose allergies. Treatments include medicines, allergy shots, and avoiding the substances that cause the reactions.


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Edema

Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body.

Causes of edema include

  • Eating too much salt
  • Sunburn
  • Heart failure
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver problems from cirrhosis
  • Pregnancy
  • Problems with lymph nodes, especially after mastectomy
  • Some medicines
  • Standing or walking a lot when the weather is warm

To keep swelling down, your health care provider may recommend keeping your legs raised when sitting, wearing support stockings, limiting how much salt you eat, or taking a medicine called a diuretic - also called a water pill.


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