ICD-10 Code T44.7X6A

Underdosing of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists, initial encounter

Version 2019 Replaced Code Billable Code Unacceptable Principal Diagnosis
ICD-10:T44.7X6A
Short Description:Underdosing of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists, init encntr
Long Description:Underdosing of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists, initial encounter

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 T44.7X6A is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of underdosing of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists, initial encounter. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Deleted Code

This code was deleted in the 2019 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2018. This code was replaced for the FY 2019 (October 1, 2018 - September 30, 2019).

  • K59.03 - Drug induced constipation

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Drugs primarily affecting the autonomic nervous system (T44)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Unacceptable principal diagnosis - There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Convert T44.7X6A to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • - (No Map Flag)

Information for Patients


Medication Errors

Medicines treat infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used correctly. Errors can happen in the hospital, at the health care provider's office, at the pharmacy, or at home. You can help prevent errors by

  • Knowing your medicines. When you get a prescription, ask the name of the medicine and check to make sure that the pharmacy gave you the right medicine. Make sure that you understand how often you should take the medicine and how long you should take it.
  • Keeping a list of medicines.
    • Write down all of the medicines that you are taking, including the names of your medicines, how much you take, and when you take them. Make sure to include any over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbs that you take.
    • List the medicines that you are allergic to or that have caused you problems in the past.
    • Take this list with you every time you see a health care provider.
  • Reading medicine labels and following the directions. Don't just rely on your memory - read the medication label every time. Be especially careful when giving medicines to children.
  • Asking questions. If you don't know the answers to these questions, ask your health care provider or pharmacist:
    • Why am I taking this medicine?
    • What are the common side effects?
    • What should I do if I have side effects?
    • When should I stop this medicine?
    • Can I take this medicine with the other medicines and supplements on my list?
    • Do I need to avoid certain foods or alcohol while taking this medicine?

Food and Drug Administration

  • 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes (Food and Drug Administration)
  • How and when to get rid of unused medicines (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Keeping your medications organized (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Medication safety during your hospital stay (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Medication safety: Filling your prescription (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Storing your medicines (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Taking medicine at home - create a routine (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.