2021 ICD-10-CM Code T38.7X1D

Poisoning by androgens and anabolic congeners, accidental (unintentional), subsequent encounter

Version 2021
Replaced Code
Billable Code
7th Character Code
Subsequent Code
MS-DRG Mapping
POA Exempt

Valid for Submission

T38.7X1D is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of poisoning by androgens and anabolic congeners, accidental (unintentional), subsequent encounter. The code T38.7X1D is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code T38.7X1D might also be used to specify conditions or terms like accidental methandriol overdose, accidental methandriol poisoning, accidental nandrolone overdose, accidental nandrolone poisoning, accidental oxymetholone overdose , accidental oxymetholone poisoning, etc. The code is exempt from present on admission (POA) reporting for inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals.

T38.7X1D is a subsequent encounter code, includes a 7th character and should be used after the patient has completed active treatment for a condition like poisoning by androgens and anabolic congeners accidental (unintentional). According to ICD-10-CM Guidelines a "subsequent encounter" occurs when the patient is receiving routine care for the condition during the healing or recovery phase of treatment. Subsequent diagnosis codes are appropriate during the recovery phase, no matter how many times the patient has seen the provider for this condition. If the provider needs to adjust the patient's care plan due to a setback or other complication, the encounter becomes active again.

ICD-10:T38.7X1D
Short Description:Poisoning by androgens and anabolic congeners, acc, subs
Long Description:Poisoning by androgens and anabolic congeners, accidental (unintentional), subsequent encounter

Code Classification

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2021 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2020. This code was replaced for the FY 2021 (October 1, 2020 - September 30, 2021).


  • K59.03 - Drug induced constipation

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Present on Admission (POA)

T38.7X1D is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement. Review other POA exempt codes here .

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Convert T38.7X1D to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code T38.7X1D its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Hormones

Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work slowly, over time, and affect many different processes, including

Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreas. In addition, men produce hormones in their testes and women produce them in their ovaries.

Hormones are powerful. It takes only a tiny amount to cause big changes in cells or even your whole body. That is why too much or too little of a certain hormone can be serious. Laboratory tests can measure the hormone levels in your blood, urine, or saliva. Your health care provider may perform these tests if you have symptoms of a hormone disorder. Home pregnancy tests are similar - they test for pregnancy hormones in your urine.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Medication Errors

Medicines treat infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used correctly. Errors can happen in the hospital, at the health care provider's office, at the pharmacy, or at home. You can help prevent errors by

Food and Drug Administration


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)