ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S84.20XD

Inj cutan sensory nerve at lower leg level, unsp leg, subs

Diagnosis Code S84.20XD

ICD-10: S84.20XD
Short Description: Inj cutan sensory nerve at lower leg level, unsp leg, subs
Long Description: Injury of cutaneous sensory nerve at lower leg level, unspecified leg, subsequent encounter
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S84.20XD

Valid for Submission
The code S84.20XD is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the knee and lower leg (S80-S89)
      • Injury of nerves at lower leg level (S84)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9
  • V58.89 - Other specfied aftercare (Approximate Flag)

Present on Admission (POA)
The code S84.20XD is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • Closed injury cutaneous sensory nerve, leg
  • Injury of cutaneous sensory nerve at lower leg level
  • Injury of cutaneous sensory nerve of lower limb
  • Open injury cutaneous sensory nerve, leg

Information for Patients


Leg Injuries and Disorders

Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures.

These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg problems. For example, knee osteoarthritis, common in older people, can cause pain and limited motion. Problems in your veins in your legs can lead to varicose veins or deep vein thrombosis.

  • Blount disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bowlegs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femur fracture repair - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Iliotibial band syndrome -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ischemic ulcers -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Knock knees (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Leg pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Shin splints - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Venous insufficiency (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Also called: Neuritis, Peripheral neuritis, Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Axillary nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Distal median nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metabolic neuropathies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mononeuritis multiplex (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuropathy secondary to drugs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peripheral neuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Sensorimotor polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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