ICD-10-CM Code S52.569B

Barton's fracture of unspecified radius, initial encounter for open fracture type I or II

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

S52.569B is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of barton's fracture of unspecified radius, initial encounter for open fracture type i or ii. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code S52.569B might also be used to specify conditions or terms like barton's fracture, closed barton's fracture, closed dislocation of radiocarpal joint, closed dorsal barton's fracture, closed fracture dislocation radiocarpal joint, closed traumatic dislocation of radiocarpal joint, etc

ICD-10:S52.569B
Short Description:Barton's fracture of unsp radius, init for opn fx type I/2
Long Description:Barton's fracture of unspecified radius, initial encounter for open fracture type I or II

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Barton's fracture
  • Closed Barton's fracture
  • Closed dislocation of radiocarpal joint
  • Closed dorsal Barton's fracture
  • Closed fracture dislocation radiocarpal joint
  • Closed traumatic dislocation of radiocarpal joint
  • Closed volar Barton's fracture
  • Dorsal Barton's fracture
  • Open Barton's fracture
  • Open dorsal Barton's fracture
  • Open fracture dislocation radiocarpal joint
  • Open traumatic dislocation radiocarpal joint
  • Open volar Barton's fracture
  • Volar Barton's fracture

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code S52.569B is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 562 - FRACTURE, SPRAIN, STRAIN AND DISLOCATION EXCEPT FEMUR, HIP, PELVIS AND THIGH WITH MCC
  • 563 - FRACTURE, SPRAIN, STRAIN AND DISLOCATION EXCEPT FEMUR, HIP, PELVIS AND THIGH WITHOUT MCC

Convert S52.569B to ICD-9

  • 813.52 - Fx distal radius NEC-opn (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the elbow and forearm (S50-S59)
      • Fracture of forearm (S52)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Dislocations

Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a blow, sometimes from playing a contact sport. You can dislocate your ankles, knees, shoulders, hips, elbows and jaw. You can also dislocate your finger and toe joints. Dislocated joints often are swollen, very painful and visibly out of place. You may not be able to move it.

A dislocated joint is an emergency. If you have one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, medicine, a splint or sling, and rehabilitation. When properly repositioned, a joint will usually function and move normally again in a few weeks. Once you dislocate a shoulder or kneecap, you are more likely to dislocate it again. Wearing protective gear during sports may help prevent dislocations.

  • Dislocated shoulder - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dislocation (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kneecap dislocation (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kneecap dislocation - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nursemaid's elbow (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Fractures

Also called: Broken bone

A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open or compound fracture. Fractures commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the bone.

Symptoms of a fracture are

  • Intense pain
  • Deformity - the limb looks out of place
  • Swelling, bruising, or tenderness around the injury
  • Numbness and tingling
  • Problems moving a limb

You need to get medical care right away for any fracture. An x-ray can tell if your bone is broken. You may need to wear a cast or splint. Sometimes you need surgery to put in plates, pins or screws to keep the bone in place.

  • Broken bone (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Closed reduction of a fractured bone (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Closed reduction of a fractured bone - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Wrist Injuries and Disorders

Your wrist is made up of eight small bones known as carpals. They support a tube that runs through your wrist. That tube, called the carpal tunnel, has tendons and a nerve inside. It is covered by a ligament, which holds it in place.

Wrist pain is common. Repetitive motion can damage your wrist. Everyday activities like typing, racquet sports or sewing can cause pain, or even carpal tunnel syndrome. Wrist pain with bruising and swelling can be a sign of injury. The signs of a possible fracture include misshapen joints and inability to move your wrist. Some wrist fractures are a result of osteoporosis.

Other common causes of pain are

  • Sprains and strains
  • Tendinitis
  • Arthritis
  • Gout and pseudogout
  • Colles wrist fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • De Quervain tendinitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wrist arthroscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wrist pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wrist sprain - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]