ICD-10 Code S38.221A

Complete traumatic amputation of penis, initial encounter

Version 2019 Billable Code Diagnoses For Males Only
ICD-10: S38.221A
Short Description:Complete traumatic amputation of penis, initial encounter
Long Description:Complete traumatic amputation of penis, initial encounter

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 S38.221A is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of complete traumatic amputation of penis, initial encounter. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the abdomen, lower back, lumbar spine, pelvis and external genitals (S30-S39)
      • Crush inj & traum amp of abd,low back, pelv & extrn genitals (S38)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Diagnoses for males only - Diagnoses for males only.

Convert S38.221A to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 878.0 - Open wound of penis (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Acquired absence of male genital organ
  • Open wound of penis
  • Traumatic amputation of entire penis
  • Traumatic amputation of external genital organs
  • Traumatic amputation of penis

Information for Patients


Penis Disorders

Also called: Penile disorders

Problems with the penis can cause pain and affect a man's sexual function and fertility. Penis disorders include

  • Erectile dysfunction - inability to get or keep an erection
  • Priapism - a painful erection that does not go away
  • Peyronie's disease - bending of the penis during an erection due to a hard lump called a plaque
  • Balanitis - inflammation of the skin covering the head of the penis, most often in men and boys who have not been circumcised
  • Penile cancer - a rare form of cancer, highly curable when caught early
  • Balanitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cancer - penis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Curvature of the penis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Epididymitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Epispadias (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Erythroplasia of Queyrat (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hypospadias (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hypospadias repair (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hypospadias repair - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Paraphimosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Penis pain (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Wounds and Injuries

Also called: Traumatic injuries

An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, hits, weapons, and more. In the U.S., millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can happen at work or play, indoors or outdoors, driving a car, or walking across the street.

Wounds are injuries that break the skin or other body tissues. They include cuts, scrapes, scratches, and punctured skin. They often happen because of an accident, but surgery, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. Minor wounds usually aren't serious, but it is important to clean them. Serious and infected wounds may require first aid followed by a visit to your doctor. You should also seek attention if the wound is deep, you cannot close it yourself, you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or it does not heal.

Other common types of injuries include

  • Animal bites
  • Bruises
  • Burns
  • Dislocations
  • Electrical injuries
  • Fractures
  • Sprains and strains
  • Bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Crush injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cuts and puncture wounds (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Electrical injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gunshot wounds -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How wounds heal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Laceration - sutures or staples - at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lacerations - liquid bandage (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wet to dry dressing changes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wound care centers (Medical Encyclopedia)

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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.