ICD-10 Code S21.209

Unspecified open wound of unspecified back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity

Version 2019 Non-Billable Code
ICD-10:S21.209
Short Description:Unsp opn wnd unsp bk wl of thorax w/o penet thoracic cavity
Long Description:Unspecified open wound of unspecified back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10 S21.209 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of unspecified open wound of unspecified back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity. The code is NOT valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • S21.209A - Unspecified open wound of unspecified back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity, initial encounter
  • S21.209D - Unspecified open wound of unspecified back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity, subsequent encounter
  • S21.209S - Unspecified open wound of unspecified back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity, sequela

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the thorax (S20-S29)
      • Open wound of thorax (S21)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code S21.209 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 604 - TRAUMA TO THE SKIN, SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE AND BREAST WITH MCC
  • 604 - TRAUMA TO THE SKIN, SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE AND BREAST WITH MCC
  • 605 - TRAUMA TO THE SKIN, SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE AND BREAST WITHOUT MCC
  • 605 - TRAUMA TO THE SKIN, SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE AND BREAST WITHOUT MCC
  • 949 - AFTERCARE WITH CC/MCC
  • 950 - AFTERCARE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Avulsion of skin
  • Degloving injury back
  • Degloving injury chest wall
  • Degloving injury of trunk
  • Degloving injury, scapular area
  • Dislocation of costovertebral joint
  • Dislocation of scapulothoracic joint
  • Fracture of first thoracic vertebra
  • Fracture of fourth thoracic vertebra
  • Fracture of second thoracic vertebra
  • Fracture of third thoracic vertebra
  • Glass in back
  • Injury at T7 - T12 level with central cord syndrome
  • Injury at T7-T12 level with anterior cord syndrome
  • Open dislocation of scapula
  • Open dislocation of thoracic and/or lumbar spine
  • Open dislocation of thoracic and/or lumbar spine
  • Open dislocation thoracic spine
  • Open fracture of first thoracic vertebra
  • Open fracture of fourth thoracic vertebra
  • Open fracture of second thoracic vertebra
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with anterior cord syndrome
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with central cord syndrome
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of third thoracic vertebra
  • Open fracture of thoracic spine with spinal cord injury
  • Open spinal dislocation with anterior thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal dislocation with central thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal dislocation with complete thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal dislocation with posterior thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal fracture with central thoracic cord lesion, T7-12
  • Open spinal subluxation with anterior thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal subluxation with central thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal subluxation with complete thoracic cord lesion
  • Open spinal subluxation with posterior thoracic cord lesion
  • Open subluxation thoracic spine
  • Open traumatic dislocation costovertebral joint
  • Open traumatic dislocation of scapulothoracic joint
  • Open wound of back
  • Open wound of back wall of thorax
  • Open wound of back with complication
  • Open wound of back, uncomplicated
  • Open wound of scapular region
  • Open wound of scapular region with complication
  • Open wound of scapular region with tendon involvement
  • Open wound of scapular region without complication
  • Open wound of shoulder region and upper limb
  • Open wound of shoulder region and upper limb with tendon involvement
  • Spinal dislocation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal dislocation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal dislocation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal dislocation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal subluxation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal subluxation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal subluxation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Spinal subluxation with thoracic cord lesion
  • Subluxation of joint of thoracic spine
  • Traumatic dislocation of joint of thoracic vertebra
  • Traumatic dislocation of scapulothoracic joint

Information for Patients


Back Injuries

Your back is made of bones, muscles, and other tissues extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, or a sudden jolt such as a car accident. The lower back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include

  • Sprains and strains
  • Herniated disks
  • Fractured vertebrae

These injuries can cause pain and limit your movement. Treatments vary but might include medicines, icing, bed rest, physical therapy, or surgery. You might be able to prevent some back injuries by maintaining a healthy weight, lifting objects with your legs, and using lower-back support when you sit.

  • Back pain - returning to work (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Back pain and sports (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lifting and bending the right way (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Returning to sports after a back injury (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Wounds and Injuries

Also called: Traumatic injuries

An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, hits, weapons, and more. In the U.S., millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can happen at work or play, indoors or outdoors, driving a car, or walking across the street.

Wounds are injuries that break the skin or other body tissues. They include cuts, scrapes, scratches, and punctured skin. They often happen because of an accident, but surgery, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. Minor wounds usually aren't serious, but it is important to clean them. Serious and infected wounds may require first aid followed by a visit to your doctor. You should also seek attention if the wound is deep, you cannot close it yourself, you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or it does not heal.

Other common types of injuries include

  • Animal bites
  • Bruises
  • Burns
  • Dislocations
  • Electrical injuries
  • Fractures
  • Sprains and strains
  • Bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Crush injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cuts and puncture wounds (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Electrical injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gunshot wounds -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How wounds heal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Laceration - sutures or staples - at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lacerations - liquid bandage (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wet to dry dressing changes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wound care centers (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.