2022 ICD-10-CM Code S06.360D

Traumatic hemorrhage of cerebrum, unspecified, without loss of consciousness, subsequent encounter

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:S06.360D
Short Description:Traum hemor cereb, w/o loss of consciousness, subs
Long Description:Traumatic hemorrhage of cerebrum, unspecified, without loss of consciousness, subsequent encounter

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the head (S00-S09)
      • Intracranial injury (S06)

S06.360D is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of traumatic hemorrhage of cerebrum, unspecified, without loss of consciousness, subsequent encounter. The code S06.360D is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code S06.360D might also be used to specify conditions or terms like thalamic hemorrhage or traumatic hemorrhage of thalamus. The code is exempt from present on admission (POA) reporting for inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals.

S06.360D is a subsequent encounter code, includes a 7th character and should be used after the patient has completed active treatment for a condition like traumatic hemorrhage of cerebrum unspecified without loss of consciousness. According to ICD-10-CM Guidelines a "subsequent encounter" occurs when the patient is receiving routine care for the condition during the healing or recovery phase of treatment. Subsequent diagnosis codes are appropriate during the recovery phase, no matter how many times the patient has seen the provider for this condition. If the provider needs to adjust the patient's care plan due to a setback or other complication, the encounter becomes active again.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like S06.360D are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

Coding Guidelines

The appropriate 7th character is to be added to each code from block Intracranial injury (S06). Use the following options for the aplicable episode of care:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Present on Admission (POA)

S06.360D is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement. Review other POA exempt codes here.

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Convert S06.360D to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code S06.360D its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Traumatic Brain Injury

What is traumatic brain injury (TBI)?

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a sudden injury that causes damage to the brain. It may happen when there is a blow, bump, or jolt to the head. This is a closed head injury. A TBI can also happen when an object penetrates the skull. This is a penetrating injury.

Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe. Concussions are a type of mild TBI. The effects of a concussion can sometimes be serious, but most people completely recover in time. More severe TBI can lead to serious physical and psychological symptoms, coma, and even death.

What causes traumatic brain injury (TBI)?

The main causes of TBI depend on the type of head injury:

Some accidents such as explosions, natural disasters, or other extreme events can cause both closed and penetrating TBI in the same person.

Who is at risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI)?

Certain groups are at higher risk of TBI:

What are the symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI)?

The symptoms of TBI depend on the type of injury and how serious the brain damage is.

The symptoms of mild TBI can include

If you have a moderate or severe TBI, you may have those same symptoms. You may also have other symptoms such as

How is traumatic brain injury (TBI) diagnosed?

If you have a head injury or other trauma that may have caused a TBI, you need to get medical care as soon as possible. To make a diagnosis, your health care provider

What are the treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI)?

The treatments for TBI depend on many factors, including the size, severity, and location of the brain injury.

For mild TBI, the main treatment is rest. If you have a headache, you can try taking over-the-counter pain relievers. It is important to follow your health care provider's instructions for complete rest and a gradual return to your normal activities. If you start doing too much too soon, it may take longer to recover. Contact your provider if your symptoms are not getting better or if you have new symptoms.

For moderate to severe TBI, the first thing health care providers will do is stabilize you to prevent further injury. They will manage your blood pressure, check the pressure inside your skull, and make sure that there is enough blood and oxygen getting to your brain.

Once you are stable, the treatments may include

Some people with TBI may have permanent disabilities. A TBI can also put you at risk for other health problems such as anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Treating these problems can improve your quality of life.

Can traumatic brain injury (TBI) be prevented?

There are steps you can take to prevent head injuries and TBIs:


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)