2021 ICD-10-CM Code R97.2

Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]

Version 2021
Replaced Code
Non-Billable Code
No Valid Principal Dx

Not Valid for Submission

R97.2 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of elevated prostate specific antigen [psa]. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

ICD-10:R97.2
Short Description:Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
Long Description:Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]

Header codes like R97.2 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for elevated prostate specific antigen [psa]:

  • R97.20 - Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
  • R97.21 - Rising PSA following treatment for malignant neoplasm of prostate

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2021 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2020. This code was replaced for the FY 2021 (October 1, 2020 - September 30, 2021).


  • R97.20 - Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
  • R97.20 - Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
  • R97.21 - Rising PSA fol treatment for malignant neoplasm of prostate
  • R97.21 - Rising PSA fol treatment for malignant neoplasm of prostate

Information for Patients


Prostate Cancer Screening

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any symptoms. Cancer found early may be easier to treat.

There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those with the fewest risks and most benefits. One test is the digital rectal exam (DRE). The doctor or nurse inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. Another test is the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. Your PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have an enlarged prostate (BPH) or other prostate problems. If your screening results are abnormal, your doctor may do more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or a biopsy.

Prostate cancer screening has risks:

You and your doctor should discuss your risk for prostate cancer, the pros and cons of the screening tests, and whether you should get them.


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Prostate Diseases

The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from the bladder and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It slowly grows larger with age. If it gets too large, it can cause problems. This is very common after age 50. The older men get, the more likely they are to have prostate trouble.

Some common problems are

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)