ICD-10-CM Code R53.81

Other malaise

Version 2021 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

R53.81 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other malaise. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R53.81 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like c/o - debility - malaise, general health deterioration, generally unwell, malaise, malaise, malaise and fatigue, etc

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R53.81
Short Description:Other malaise
Long Description:Other malaise

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R53.81:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Chronic debility
  • Debility NOS
  • General physical deterioration
  • Malaise NOS
  • Nervous debility

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • age-related physical debility R54

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R53.81 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • C/O - debility - malaise
  • General health deterioration
  • Generally unwell
  • Malaise
  • Malaise
  • Malaise and fatigue
  • Malaise associated with AIDS

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code R53.81 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 947 - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS WITH MCC
  • 948 - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS WITHOUT MCC

Convert R53.81 to ICD-9

  • 780.79 - Malaise and fatigue NEC (Approximate Flag)
  • 799.3 - Debility NOS (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • General symptoms and signs (R50-R69)
      • Malaise and fatigue (R53)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Fatigue

Also called: Tiredness, Weariness

Everyone feels tired now and then. Sometimes you may just want to stay in bed. But, after a good night's sleep, most people feel refreshed and ready to face a new day. If you continue to feel tired for weeks, it's time to see your doctor. He or she may be able to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it.

Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include

  • Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, antihistamines, and medicines for nausea and pain
  • Having medical treatments, like chemotherapy and radiation
  • Recovering from major surgery
  • Anxiety, stress, or depression
  • Staying up too late
  • Drinking too much alcohol or too many caffeinated drinks
  • Pregnancy

One disorder that causes extreme fatigue is chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that goes away after you rest. Instead, it lasts a long time and limits your ability to do ordinary daily activities.

NIH: National Institute on Aging

  • Coping with cancer -- managing fatigue (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fatigue (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]