ICD-10-CM Code R06.6

Hiccough

Version 2020 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

R06.6 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hiccough. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R06.6 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like chronic hiccup, chronic hiccups, diaphragmatic tonic spasm, hiccough present, hiccoughs, spasm of skeletal muscle of thorax, etc

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R06.6
Short Description:Hiccough
Long Description:Hiccough

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R06.6:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • psychogenic hiccough F45.8

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R06.6 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Chronic hiccup
  • Chronic hiccups
  • Diaphragmatic tonic spasm
  • Hiccough present
  • Hiccoughs
  • Spasm of skeletal muscle of thorax

Clinical Information

  • HICCUP-. a spasm of the diaphragm that causes a sudden inhalation followed by rapid closure of the glottis which produces a sound.

Convert R06.6 to ICD-9

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00-R09)
      • Abnormalities of breathing (R06)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Hiccups

Have you ever wondered what is happening when you hiccup? There are two parts to a hiccup. The first is an involuntary movement of your diaphragm. The diaphragm is a muscle at the base of your lungs. It is the main muscle used for breathing. The second part of a hiccup is a quick closing of your vocal cords. This is what causes the "hic" sound you make.

Hiccups can start and stop for no obvious reason. But they often happen when something irritates your diaphragm, such as

  • Eating too quickly
  • Eating too much
  • Eating hot or spicy foods
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Drinking carbonated drinks
  • Diseases that irritate the nerves that control the diaphragm
  • Feeling nervous or excited
  • A bloated stomach
  • Certain medicines
  • Abdominal surgery
  • Metabolic disorders
  • Central nervous system disorders

Hiccups usually go away on their own after a few minutes. You have probably heard different suggestions about how to cure hiccups. There is no proof that they work, but they are not harmful, so you could try them. They include

  • Breathing into a paper bag
  • Drinking or sipping a glass of cold water
  • Holding your breath
  • Gargling with ice water

Some people have chronic hiccups. This means that the hiccups last more than a few days or keep coming back. Chronic hiccups can interfere with your sleep, eating, drinking, and talking. If you have chronic hiccups, contact your health care provider. If you have a condition that is causing the hiccups, treating that condition may help. Otherwise, treatment options include medicines, surgery, and other procedures.


[Learn More]