ICD-10-CM Code Q62.3

Other obstructive defects of renal pelvis and ureter

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

Q62.3 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other obstructive defects of renal pelvis and ureter. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:Q62.3
Short Description:Other obstructive defects of renal pelvis and ureter
Long Description:Other obstructive defects of renal pelvis and ureter

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • Q62.31 - Congenital ureterocele, orthotopic
  • Q62.32 - Cecoureterocele
  • Q62.39 - Other obstructive defects of renal pelvis and ureter

Code Classification

  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • Congenital malformations of the urinary system (Q60-Q64)
      • Congen defects of renal pelvis and congen malform of ureter (Q62)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Ureteral Disorders

Your kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from your blood. The urine travels from the kidneys to the bladder in two thin tubes called ureters.

The ureters are about 8 to 10 inches long. Muscles in the ureter walls tighten and relax to force urine down and away from the kidneys. Small amounts of urine flow from the ureters into the bladder about every 10 to 15 seconds.

Sometimes the ureters can become blocked or injured. This can block the flow of urine to the bladder. If urine stands still or backs up the ureter, you may get a urinary tract infections.

Doctors diagnose problems with the ureters using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays, and examination of the ureter with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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