ICD-10-CM Code Q13.81

Rieger's anomaly

Version 2020 Billable Code POA Exempt

Valid for Submission

Q13.81 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of rieger's anomaly. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code Q13.81 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acquired partial lipodystrophy, axenfeld-rieger syndrome, imperforate pectinate glaucoma, irido-corneal dysgenesis, irido-trabecular dysgenesis, lipodystrophy, partial, with rieger anomaly, short stature, and insulinopenic diabetes mellitus, etc The code is exempt from present on admission (POA) reporting for inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals.

ICD-10:Q13.81
Short Description:Rieger's anomaly
Long Description:Rieger's anomaly

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code Q13.81:

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code for associated glaucoma H42

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code Q13.81 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acquired partial lipodystrophy
  • Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome
  • Imperforate pectinate glaucoma
  • Irido-corneal dysgenesis
  • Irido-trabecular dysgenesis
  • Lipodystrophy, partial, with Rieger anomaly, short stature, and insulinopenic diabetes mellitus
  • Rieger syndrome

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code Q13.81 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 124 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITH MCC
  • 125 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITHOUT MCC

Present on Admission (POA)

Q13.81 is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement. Review other POA exempt codes here .

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Convert Q13.81 to ICD-9

  • 743.44 - Anom anter chamber-eye (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • Congenital malformations of eye, ear, face and neck (Q10-Q18)
      • Congenital malformations of anterior segment of eye (Q13)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can range from mild to severe. Causes can include

  • Genetics
  • Exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome.
  • Infections during pregnancy
  • Certain medicines. Before you get pregnant, talk to your health care provider about any medicines you take.
  • Not getting enough of certain nutrients. For example, not getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy is a key factor in causing neural tube defects.

For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Health care providers can diagnose certain birth defects during pregnancy, with prenatal tests. That's why it important to get regular prenatal care. Other birth defects may not be found until after the baby is born. Sometimes the defect is obvious right away. Other times, the health care provider may not discover it until later in life.

Babies with birth defects often need special care and treatments. The treatments may include surgery, medicines, assistive devices, and therapies.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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Eye Diseases

Some eye problems are minor and don't last long. But some can lead to a permanent loss of vision.

Common eye problems include

  • Refractive errors
  • Cataracts - clouded lenses
  • Optic nerve disorders, including glaucoma
  • Retinal disorders - problems with the nerve layer at the back of the eye
  • Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision
  • Diabetic eye problems
  • Conjunctivitis - an infection also known as pinkeye

Your best defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and treatment could prevent vision loss. See an eye care professional right away if you have a sudden change in vision, if everything looks dim, or if you see flashes of light. Other symptoms that need quick attention are pain, double vision, fluid coming from the eye, and inflammation.

NIH: National Eye Institute


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Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is primarily an eye disorder, although it can also affect other parts of the body. This condition is characterized by abnormalities of the front part of the eye, an area known as the anterior segment. For example, the colored part of the eye (the iris), may be thin or poorly developed. The iris normally has a single central hole, called the pupil, through which light enters the eye. People with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome often have a pupil that is off-center (corectopia) or extra holes in the iris that can look like multiple pupils (polycoria). This condition can also cause abnormalities of the cornea, which is the clear front covering of the eye.About half of affected individuals develop glaucoma, a serious condition that increases pressure inside the eye. When glaucoma occurs with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, it most often develops in late childhood or adolescence, although it can occur as early as infancy. Glaucoma can cause vision loss or blindness.The signs and symptoms of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome can also affect other parts of the body. Many affected individuals have distinctive facial features such as widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism); a flattened mid-face with a broad, flat nasal bridge; and a prominent forehead. The condition is also associated with dental abnormalities including unusually small teeth (microdontia) or fewer than normal teeth (oligodontia). Some people with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome have extra folds of skin around their belly button (redundant periumbilical skin). Other, less common features can include heart defects, the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias), narrowing of the anus (anal stenosis), and abnormalities of the pituitary gland that can result in slow growth.Researchers have described at least three types of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. The types, which are numbered 1 through 3, are distinguished by their genetic cause.
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