ICD-10-CM Code P23.4

Congenital pneumonia due to Escherichia coli

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

P23.4 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of congenital pneumonia due to escherichia coli. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code P23.4 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like congenital bacterial pneumonia or congenital escherichia coli pneumonia or congenital pneumonia or infective pneumonia acquired prenatally or pneumonia due to escherichia coli.

ICD-10:P23.4
Short Description:Congenital pneumonia due to Escherichia coli
Long Description:Congenital pneumonia due to Escherichia coli

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code P23.4 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Congenital bacterial pneumonia
  • Congenital Escherichia coli pneumonia
  • Congenital pneumonia
  • Infective pneumonia acquired prenatally
  • Pneumonia due to Escherichia coli

Convert P23.4 to ICD-9

  • 770.0 - Congenital pneumonia (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P00–P96)
    • Respiratory and cardiovascular disorders specific to the perinatal period (P19-P29)
      • Congenital pneumonia (P23)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


E. Coli Infections

E. coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems.

You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of infection include

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Severe abdominal cramps
  • Watery or very bloody diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Fever

To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste.

Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.


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Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of the lungs. Many germs, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can cause pneumonia. You can also get pneumonia by inhaling a liquid or chemical. People most at risk are older than 65 or younger than 2 years of age, or already have health problems.

Symptoms of pneumonia vary from mild to severe. See your doctor promptly if you

  • Have a high fever
  • Have shaking chills
  • Have a cough with phlegm that doesn't improve or gets worse
  • Develop shortness of breath with normal daily activities
  • Have chest pain when you breathe or cough
  • Feel suddenly worse after a cold or the flu

Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to treat it.

Preventing pneumonia is always better than treating it. Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu. Other preventive measures include washing your hands frequently and not smoking.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.


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