ICD-10-CM Code P10.0

Subdural hemorrhage due to birth injury

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

P10.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of subdural hemorrhage due to birth injury. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code P10.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like cerebral injury due to birth trauma, cerebromeningeal hemorrhage, intracranial hematoma following injury, intracranial hemorrhage due to birth trauma, local subdural hematoma due to birth trauma, subdural and cerebral hemorrhage due to birth trauma, etc

ICD-10:P10.0
Short Description:Subdural hemorrhage due to birth injury
Long Description:Subdural hemorrhage due to birth injury

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code P10.0:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Subdural hematoma (localized) due to birth injury

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • subdural hemorrhage accompanying tentorial tear P10.4

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code P10.0 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Cerebral injury due to birth trauma
  • Cerebromeningeal hemorrhage
  • Intracranial hematoma following injury
  • Intracranial hemorrhage due to birth trauma
  • Local subdural hematoma due to birth trauma
  • Subdural and cerebral hemorrhage due to birth trauma
  • Subdural hematoma
  • Subdural hemorrhage due to birth trauma
  • Subdural hemorrhage in fetus OR newborn
  • Subdural hemorrhage in fetus OR newborn
  • Traumatic hematoma of subdural space of neuraxis
  • Traumatic subdural hematoma
  • Traumatic subdural hemorrhage

Convert P10.0 to ICD-9

  • 767.0 - Cerebral hem at birth (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P00–P96)
    • Birth trauma (P10-P15)
      • Intracranial laceration and hemorrhage due to birth injury (P10)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Bleeding

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen outside or inside the body. You may bleed when you get a cut or other wound. Bleeding can also be due to an injury to internal organs.

Sometimes bleeding can cause other problems. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease.

Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.


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Childbirth Problems

While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include

  • Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Problems with the position of the baby, such as breech, in which the baby is going to come out feet first
  • Birth injuries

For some of these problems, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.


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Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that people must go to the hospital. The worst injuries can lead to permanent brain damage or death. Half of all TBIs are from motor vehicle accidents. Military personnel in combat zones are also at risk.

Symptoms of a TBI may not appear until days or weeks following the injury. A concussion is the mildest type. It can cause a headache or neck pain, nausea, ringing in the ears, dizziness, and tiredness. People with a moderate or severe TBI may have those, plus other symptoms:

  • A headache that gets worse or does not go away
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • Inability to awaken from sleep
  • Slurred speech
  • Weakness or numbness in the arms and legs
  • Dilated eye pupils

Health care professionals use a neurological exam and imaging tests to assess TBI. Serious traumatic brain injuries need emergency treatment. Treatment and outcome depend on how severe the injury is. TBI can cause a wide range of changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions. TBI can be associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. People with severe injuries usually need rehabilitation.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


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