ICD-10-CM Code P02.7

Newborn affected by chorioamnionitis

Version 2020 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

P02.7 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of newborn affected by chorioamnionitis. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:P02.7
Short Description:Newborn affected by chorioamnionitis
Long Description:Newborn affected by chorioamnionitis

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • P02.70 - Newborn affected by fetal inflammatory response syndrome
  • P02.78 - Newborn affected by other conditions from chorioamnionitis

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • P02.70 - Newborn affected by fetal inflammatory response syndrome
  • P02.78 - Newborn affected by other conditions from chorioamnionitis

Convert P02.7 to ICD-9

  • 762.7 - Chorioamnionitis aff NB

Code Classification

  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P00–P96)
    • Newborn affected by maternal factors and by complications of pregnancy, labor, and delivery (P00-P04)
      • Newborn affected by comp of placenta, cord and membranes (P02)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - Code Updated, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
    • New Description: Newborn (suspected to be) affected by chorioamnionitis
    • Previous Description: Newborn (suspected to be) affected by chorioamnionitis
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - Code Deleted, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Fetal Health and Development

A normal pregnancy lasts nine months. Each three-month period of pregnancy is called a trimester. During each trimester, the fetus grows and develops. Regular medical checkups and prenatal tests are very important. They can

  • Help keep you and your baby healthy
  • Spot problems with your baby (if there are any). In some cases, health care professionals can treat the problem before your baby is born. But even when they cannot, it can still be helpful to know about the problem early on. That gives you time to learn about your baby's condition and prepare for any challenges you may face after the baby is born.
  • Prevent problems during delivery. For example, if your baby is breech (bottom first or feet first, instead of head first), you may need to have a Cesarean section to avoid complications.

Besides getting medical care, there are other things you can do to keep your baby as healthy as possible. It's important not to drink or smoke. Try to eat a healthy diet and make sure to take care of any health problems you have during pregnancy.


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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.


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