ICD-10-CM Code O9A.12

Malignant neoplasm complicating childbirth

Version 2020 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only

Valid for Submission

O9A.12 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of malignant neoplasm complicating childbirth. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code O9A.12 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like malignant neoplastic disease in mother complicating childbirth.

The code O9A.12 is applicable to female patients aged 12 through 55 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient outside the stated age range.

ICD-10:O9A.12
Short Description:Malignant neoplasm complicating childbirth
Long Description:Malignant neoplasm complicating childbirth

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code O9A.12 are found in the index:


Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Maternity diagnoses - Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Malignant neoplastic disease in mother complicating childbirth

Convert O9A.12 to ICD-9

  • 648.91 - Oth curr cond-delivered (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Other obstetric conditions, not elsewhere classified (O94-O9A)
      • Maternl malig or injury compl preg/childbrth (O9A)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Childbirth Problems

While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include

  • Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Problems with the position of the baby, such as breech, in which the baby is going to come out feet first
  • Birth injuries

For some of these problems, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.


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Tumors and Pregnancy

Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. Cancer itself rarely harms the baby, and some cancer treatments are safe during pregnancy. You and your health care provider will work together to find the best treatment. Your options will depend on how far along the pregnancy is, as well as the type, size, and stage of your cancer.

Another type of tumor that women can get is called a gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). It happens when a fertilized egg doesn't become a fetus. GTD is not always easy to find. It is usually benign, but some types can be malignant. The most common type of GTD is a molar pregnancy. In its early stages, it may look like a normal pregnancy. You should see your health care provider if you have vaginal bleeding (not menstrual bleeding).

Treatment depends on the type of tumor, whether it has spread to other places, and your overall health.


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