ICD-10 Diagnosis Code O36.21X9

Maternal care for hydrops fetalis, first trimester, oth

Diagnosis Code O36.21X9

ICD-10: O36.21X9
Short Description: Maternal care for hydrops fetalis, first trimester, oth
Long Description: Maternal care for hydrops fetalis, first trimester, other fetus
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code O36.21X9

Valid for Submission
The code O36.21X9 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Maternal care related to the fetus and amniotic cavity and possible delivery problems (O30-O48)
      • Maternal care for other fetal problems (O36)

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Edema

Also called: Dropsy

Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body.

Causes of edema include

  • Eating too much salt
  • Sunburn
  • Heart failure
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver problems from cirrhosis
  • Pregnancy
  • Problems with lymph nodes, especially after mastectomy
  • Some medicines
  • Standing or walking a lot when the weather is warm

To keep swelling down, your health care provider may recommend keeping your legs raised when sitting, wearing support stockings, limiting how much salt you eat, or taking a medicine called a diuretic - also called a water pill.

  • Abdominal tap (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Angioedema (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pulmonary edema (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Fetal Health and Development

A normal pregnancy lasts nine months. Each three-month period of pregnancy is called a trimester. During each trimester, the fetus grows and develops. Regular medical checkups and prenatal tests are very important. They can

  • Help keep you and your baby healthy
  • Spot problems with your baby (if there are any). In some cases, health care professionals can treat the problem before your baby is born. But even when they cannot, it can still be helpful to know about the problem early on. That gives you time to learn about your baby's condition and prepare for any challenges you may face after the baby is born.
  • Prevent problems during delivery. For example, if your baby is breech (bottom first or feet first, instead of head first), you may need to have a Cesarean section to avoid complications.

Besides getting medical care, there are other things you can do to keep your baby as healthy as possible. It's important not to drink or smoke. Try to eat a healthy diet and make sure to take care of any health problems you have during pregnancy.

  • Fetal development (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intrauterine growth restriction (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Rh Incompatibility

There are four major blood types: A, B, O, and AB. The types are based on substances on the surface of the blood cells. Another blood type is called Rh. Rh factor is a protein on red blood cells. Most people are Rh-positive; they have Rh factor. Rh-negative people don't have it. Rh factor is inherited through genes.

When you're pregnant, blood from your baby can cross into your bloodstream, especially during delivery. If you're Rh-negative and your baby is Rh-positive, your body will react to the baby's blood as a foreign substance. It will create antibodies (proteins) against the baby's blood. These antibodies usually don't cause problems during a first pregnancy.

But Rh incompatibility may cause problems in later pregnancies, if the baby is Rh-positive. This is because the antibodies stay in your body once they have formed. The antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the baby's red blood cells. The baby could get Rh disease, a serious condition that can cause a serious type of anemia.

Blood tests can tell whether you have Rh factor and whether your body has made antibodies. Injections of a medicine called Rh immune globulin can keep your body from making Rh antibodies. It helps prevent the problems of Rh incompatibility. If treatment is needed for the baby, it can include supplements to help the body to make red blood cells and blood transfusions.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hemolytic disease of the newborn (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rh incompatibility (Medical Encyclopedia)


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O36.21X5
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O36.22