ICD-10 Diagnosis Code O35.3XX4

Matern care for damag to fts from viral dis in mother, fts4

Diagnosis Code O35.3XX4

ICD-10: O35.3XX4
Short Description: Matern care for damag to fts from viral dis in mother, fts4
Long Description: Maternal care for (suspected) damage to fetus from viral disease in mother, fetus 4
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code O35.3XX4

Valid for Submission
The code O35.3XX4 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Maternal care related to the fetus and amniotic cavity and possible delivery problems (O30-O48)
      • Maternal care for known or suspected fetal abnlt and damage (O35)


Version 2019 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Maternity diagnoses - Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
Diagnoses for females only - Diagnoses for females only.

Convert to ICD-9
  • 655.31 - Fet damg d/t virus-deliv (Approximate Flag)
  • 655.33 - Fet damg d/t virus-antep (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Fetal Health and Development

A normal pregnancy lasts nine months. Each three-month period of pregnancy is called a trimester. During each trimester, the fetus grows and develops. Regular medical checkups and prenatal tests are very important. They can

  • Help keep you and your baby healthy
  • Spot problems with your baby (if there are any). In some cases, health care professionals can treat the problem before your baby is born. But even when they cannot, it can still be helpful to know about the problem early on. That gives you time to learn about your baby's condition and prepare for any challenges you may face after the baby is born.
  • Prevent problems during delivery. For example, if your baby is breech (bottom first or feet first, instead of head first), you may need to have a Cesarean section to avoid complications.

Besides getting medical care, there are other things you can do to keep your baby as healthy as possible. It's important not to drink or smoke. Try to eat a healthy diet and make sure to take care of any health problems you have during pregnancy.

  • Fetal development (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intrauterine growth restriction (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Infections and Pregnancy

During pregnancy, some common infections like the common cold or a skin infection do not usually cause serious problems. But other infections can be dangerous to you, your baby, or both. Some infections may lead to preterm birth and low birth weight babies. Others can cause serious illness, birth defects, and lifelong disabilities, such as hearing loss or learning problems.

Some of the infections that can be dangerous during pregnancy include

  • Bacterial vaginosis (BV)
  • Group B strep (GBS)
  • Hepatitis
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Yeast infections
  • Zika virus

To try to prevent infections,

  • Don't eat raw or undercooked meat
  • Don't share food or drinks with other people
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Don't empty cat litter. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis.

If you do get an infection during pregnancy, contact your health care provider about how best to protect you and your baby. Only some medicines are safe during pregnancy.

  • Group B streptococcal septicemia of the newborn (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Group B streptococcus - pregnancy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Immunization and Pregnancy (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pregnancy and the flu (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pregnant Women Need a Flu Shot (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Protect Your Baby for Life: When a Pregnant Woman Has Hepatitis B (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Women (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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