ICD-10 Code O26.813

Pregnancy related exhaustion and fatigue, third trimester

Version 2019 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only Third Trimester (28+ weeks)

Valid for Submission

O26.813 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of pregnancy related exhaustion and fatigue, third trimester. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: O26.813
Short Description:Pregnancy related exhaustion and fatigue, third trimester
Long Description:Pregnancy related exhaustion and fatigue, third trimester

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Other maternal disorders predominantly related to pregnancy (O20-O29)
      • Maternal care for oth conditions predom related to pregnancy (O26)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Maternity diagnoses - Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code O26.813 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 817 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH MCC
  • 818 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH CC
  • 819 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert O26.813 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 646.81 - Preg compl NEC-delivered (Approximate Flag)
  • 646.83 - Preg compl NEC-antepart (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Fatigue

Everyone feels tired now and then. Sometimes you may just want to stay in bed. But, after a good night's sleep, most people feel refreshed and ready to face a new day. If you continue to feel tired for weeks, it's time to see your doctor. He or she may be able to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it.

Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include

  • Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, antihistamines, and medicines for nausea and pain
  • Having medical treatments, like chemotherapy and radiation
  • Recovering from major surgery
  • Anxiety, stress, or depression
  • Staying up too late
  • Drinking too much alcohol or too many caffeinated drinks
  • Pregnancy

One disorder that causes extreme fatigue is chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that goes away after you rest. Instead, it lasts a long time and limits your ability to do ordinary daily activities.

NIH: National Institute on Aging


[Learn More]

Pregnancy

You're going to have a baby! It's an exciting time, but it can also feel a bit overwhelming. You may have a lot of questions, including what you can do to give your baby a healthy start. To keep you and your baby healthy during pregnancy, it is important to

  • Have regular visits with your health care provider. These prenatal care visits help make sure that you and your baby are healthy. And if there are any health problems, your provider can find them early. Getting treatment right away can cure many problems and prevent others.
  • Eat healthy and drink plenty of water. Good nutrition during pregnancy includes eating a variety of
    • Fruits
    • Vegetables
    • Whole grains
    • Lean meats or other protein sources
    • Low-fat dairy products
  • Take prenatal vitamins. Pregnant women need higher amounts of certain vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid and iron.
  • Be careful with medicines. Always check with your health care provider before you start or stop any medicine. This includes over-the-counter medicines and dietary or herbal supplements.
  • Stay active. Physical activity can help you stay strong, feel and sleep better, and prepare your body for birth. Check with your provider about which types of activities are right for you.
  • Avoid substances that could hurt your baby, such as alcohol, drugs, and tobacco.

Your body will keep changing as your baby grows. It can be hard to know whether a new symptom is normal or could be a sign of a problem. Check with your health care provider if something is bothering or worrying you.


[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.