ICD-10-CM Code O22.23

Superficial thrombophlebitis in pregnancy, third trimester

Version 2020 Billable Code Maternity Diagnoses Diagnoses For Females Only Third Trimester (28+ weeks)

Valid for Submission

O22.23 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of superficial thrombophlebitis in pregnancy, third trimester. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The code O22.23 is applicable to female patients aged 12 through 55 years inclusive. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient outside the stated age range.

ICD-10:O22.23
Short Description:Superficial thrombophlebitis in pregnancy, third trimester
Long Description:Superficial thrombophlebitis in pregnancy, third trimester

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Maternity diagnoses - Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).
  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code O22.23 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 817 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH MCC
  • 818 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITH CC
  • 819 - OTHER ANTEPARTUM DIAGNOSES WITH O.R. PROCEDURE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert O22.23 to ICD-9

  • 671.21 - Thrombophlebitis-deliver (Approximate Flag)
  • 671.23 - Thrombophlebit-antepart (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00–O99)
    • Other maternal disorders predominantly related to pregnancy (O20-O29)
      • Venous complications and hemorrhoids in pregnancy (O22)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Blood Clots

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. After the bleeding stops and healing takes place, your body usually breaks down and removes the clot. But some people get too many clots or their blood clots abnormally. Many conditions can cause the blood to clot too much or prevent blood clots from dissolving properly.

Risk factors for excessive blood clotting include

  • Certain genetic disorders
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Diabetes
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome
  • Some medicines
  • Smoking
  • Staying in one position for a long time, such as being in the hospital or taking a long car or plane ride
  • Cancer and cancer treatments
Blood clots can form in, or travel to, the blood vessels in the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, and limbs. A clot in the veins deep in the limbs is called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT usually affects the deep veins of the legs. If a blood clot in a deep vein breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs and blocks blood flow, it is called a pulmonary embolism. Other complications of blood clots include stroke, heart attack, kidney problems, kidney failure, and pregnancy-related problems. Treatments for blood clots include blood thinners and other medicines.
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Health Problems in Pregnancy

Every pregnancy has some risk of problems. You may have problems because of a health condition you had before you got pregnant. You could also develop a condition during pregnancy. Other causes of problems during pregnancy can include being pregnant with more than one baby, a health problem in a previous pregnancy, substance abuse during pregnancy, or being over age 35. Any of these can affect your health, the health of your baby, or both.

If you have a chronic condition, you should talk to your health care provider about how to minimize your risk before you get pregnant. Once you are pregnant, you may need a health care team to monitor your pregnancy. Some common conditions that can complicate a pregnancy include

  • High blood pressure
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Kidney problems
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Obesity
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cancer
  • Infections

Other conditions that can make pregnancy risky can happen while you are pregnant - for example, gestational diabetes and Rh incompatibility. Good prenatal care can help detect and treat them.

Some discomforts, like nausea, back pain, and fatigue, are common during pregnancy. Sometimes it is hard to know what is normal. Call your health care provider if something is bothering or worrying you.


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