ICD-10 Code N95.0

Postmenopausal bleeding

Version 2019 Billable Code Diagnoses For Females Only
ICD-10: N95.0
Short Description:Postmenopausal bleeding
Long Description:Postmenopausal bleeding

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 N95.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of postmenopausal bleeding. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Noninflammatory disorders of female genital tract (N80-N98)
      • Menopausal and other perimenopausal disorders (N95)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Diagnoses for females only - Diagnoses for females only.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code N95.0 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 742 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 743 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert N95.0 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 627.1 - Postmenopausal bleeding

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Postcoital bleeding
  • Postmenopausal bleeding
  • Postmenopausal postcoital bleeding

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N95.0 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Menopause

Also called: Change of life

Menopause is the time in a woman's life when her period stops. It usually occurs naturally, most often after age 45. Menopause happens because the woman's ovaries stop producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone.

A woman has reached menopause when she has not had a period for one year. Changes and symptoms can start several years earlier. They include

  • A change in periods - shorter or longer, lighter or heavier, with more or less time in between
  • Hot flashes and/or night sweats
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Mood swings
  • Trouble focusing
  • Less hair on head, more on face

Some symptoms require treatment. Talk to your doctor about how to best manage menopause. Make sure the doctor knows your medical history and your family medical history. This includes whether you are at risk for heart disease, osteoporosis, or breast cancer.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • Cancer treatment -- early menopause (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Deciding about hormone therapy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Menopause (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Types of hormone therapy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • What is Menopause? - NIH (National Institute on Aging)

[Learn More]

Vaginal Bleeding

Also called: Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding, Uterine Bleeding

Menstruation, or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It could be bleeding that is between periods, is very heavy, or lasts much longer than usual. It also includes bleeding that happens before puberty or after menopause. Causes can include

  • Uterine fibroids or polyps
  • Hormone problems
  • Hormone pills, such as birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy (menopausal hormone therapy)
  • Cancer of the cervix, ovaries, uterus or vagina
  • Thyroid problems

Bleeding during pregnancy can have several different causes. It is not always serious, but to be safe you should contact your health care provider right away.

Pelvic exams, blood tests, imaging tests, and other procedures can help your health care provider diagnose the problem. Treatment depends on the cause. Treatments may include medicines, hormones, and surgery.

  • D and C (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal bleeding between periods (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.