ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M89.65

Osteopathy after poliomyelitis, thigh

Diagnosis Code M89.65

ICD-10: M89.65
Short Description: Osteopathy after poliomyelitis, thigh
Long Description: Osteopathy after poliomyelitis, thigh
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M89.65

Not Valid for Submission
The code M89.65 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Other osteopathies (M86-M90)
      • Other disorders of bone (M89)

Information for Patients


Bone Diseases

Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D, and exercise. You should also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol.

Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds of bone problems include

  • Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and more likely to break
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle
  • Paget's disease of bone makes them weak
  • Bones can also develop cancer and infections
  • Other bone diseases, which are caused by poor nutrition, genetics, or problems with the rate of bone growth or rebuilding

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • ALP - blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • ALP isoenzyme test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Blount disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone lesion biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone pain or tenderness (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone tumor (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bowlegs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fibrous dysplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Osteomalacia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Osteopenia - premature infants (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome

Also called: Infantile paralysis, PPS, Poliomyelitis

Polio is an infectious disease caused by a virus. The virus lives in an infected person's throat and intestines. It is most often spread by contact with the stool of an infected person. You can also get it from droplets if an infected person sneezes or coughs. It can contaminate food and water if people do not wash their hands.

Most people have no symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include fever, fatigue, nausea, headache, flu-like symptoms, stiff neck and back, and pain in the limbs. A few people will become paralyzed. There is no treatment to reverse the paralysis of polio.

Some people who've had polio develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) years later. Symptoms include tiredness, new muscle weakness, and muscle and joint pain. There is no way to prevent or cure PPS.

The polio vaccine has wiped out polio in the United States and most other countries.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Polio: Information for Parents (American Academy of Family Physicians)
  • Polio: Information for Parents (American Academy of Pediatrics)
  • Polio: Information for Parents (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Poliomyelitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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